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Dr Who

Up to date as of January 31, 2010

From TARDIS Index File, the free Doctor Who reference.

The Toys were a type of artificially created organisms which can sense the emotions of others.

Biology

The Toys were humanoid in their natural form. When they aren't bonded to another being, they look something like featureless mannequins made out of flesh. Toys have the ability to sense the emotions of nearby people and will then change their appearance to match the needs of these people. They can also change their behaviours into whatever the person needs at the time. After spending a long period of time with a person they will become bonded to them and will sicken and die without this person.

The Toys were created by modifying the cells of dead Humans and then growing them in chambers. They are nearly identical to human except for two glands by their neck with power their empathic abilities. If these glands are removed, the Toys quickly die. (NA: Bad Therapy)

History

The Toys were originally created by Moriah to replace his wife, Petruska, after he killed her for being unfaithful. After searching the universe for ways to bring her back, he decided to create the Toys to copy her. He founded the Petruska Institute in the 1950s in London as a front to his studies, using the Toys as psychological therapists. This attempt continually failed, since, deep down, he felt guilty about killing Petruska, which meant the Toys always fought back against him. One of them, later known as Tilda Jupp, was able to escape and helped smuggle Toys out of the institute and helped them bond to Humans. (NA: Bad Therapy)


This article uses material from the "Toy" article on the Dr Who wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Guild Wars

Up to date as of February 01, 2010
(Redirected to Miniature article)

From GuildWiki

Contents

General

Miniatures, also referred to as "mini pets," are in-game vanity items that can be obtained through various sources. When activated, a small duplicate of the named creature will appear and follow you around. Miniatures were originally created as "birthday presents" to show appreciation for long-time players, but have since become available through many other means.

  • Miniatures are activated by double-clicking on the item in your inventory, and can be de-activated the same way.
  • Only one miniature can be active per character at a time. If you activate a second one, it will replace the active one automatically. Two identical miniatures in a character's inventory are treated as one miniature for this purpose (if one is active, double-clicking the other will de-activate it, rather than replace it).
  • An activated miniature will stay activated even if you place it in storage, but will disappear if it is traded with someone.
  • Miniatures can be used in explorable areas, missions, towns, or outposts.
  • Only 20 miniatures can be active in the same district.
  • Miniatures can be traded, dropped, destroyed, and placed in storage.
  • Miniatures cannot be dyed or sold to Merchants.
  • A character can carry multiple miniatures in his or her inventory.
  • Miniatures exist of creatures from all campaigns, but are not limited by the campaigns unlocked on a player's account. A player who only owns Prophecies can still receive a miniature of a Factions or Nightfall creature.
  • Miniatures cannot attack, nor do they have skills or special abilities. They cannot be targeted, do not count as allies for Leadership, and have no collision box.
  • Some miniatures make noises in explorable areas.
Image:Bug.png Bug! Although they are ignored by Leadership, miniatures do count as an ally of the owner's party for many skills and can be hit by AoE effects.
Dedicated vs. Undedicated miniature

Monument of Devotion

The miniatures a player has collected can be displayed in the Monument of Devotion part of the Hall of Monuments in the Eye of the North expansion.

  • Each miniature may only be added to a single character's monument. Once added, the miniature will be marked as "Dedicated" and cannot be added to any other characters' monuments, although other characters can still carry and use the miniature.
  • The Monument of Devotion is considered "complete" when 20 miniatures have been added. You may continue to add more miniatures, but only 20 will be displayed at a time.

Acquisition

Miniatures can be acquired in many ways:

  • By opening a Birthday Present (see Drop rate/Birthday Present).
  • By opening a Collector's Edition Present.
    • Players who purchased the Collector's Edition of Guild Wars Factions or Nightfall received a miniature Kuunavang or Varesh, respectively, as a show of appreciation.
  • As a promotional giveaway at conventions and through various gaming magazines.
  • As a prize in a Guild Wars contest.
  • Through various in-game sources.

Details on the acquisition of each miniature are given in the tables below.

List of Miniatures

Birthday Presents

Color First annual series Second annual series Third annual series Fourth annual series
Icon Name Icon Name Icon Name Icon Name
Green Bone Dragon Bone Dragon Gwen Gwen Mad King Thorn Mad King Thorn Eye of Janthir Eye of Janthir
Gold Prince Rurik Prince Rurik Lich Lord Lich Black Beast The Black Beast of Aaaaarrrrrrggghhh Dagnar Stonepate Dagnar Stonepate
Gold Shiro Tagachi Shiro Water Djinn Water Djinn White Rabbit White Rabbit1 Flame Djinn Flame Djinn
Purple Burning Titan Burning Titan Elf Elf Freezie Freezie Flowstone Elemental Flowstone Elemental
Purple Charr Shaman Charr Shaman Koss Koss Nornbear Nornbear Jora Jora
Purple Kirin Kirin PalawaJoko Palawa Joko Ooze Ooze Nian Nian
White Fungal Wallow Fungal Wallow Aatxe Aatxe Abyssal Abyssal Abomination Abomination
White Hydra Hydra Fire Imp Fire Imp Cave Spider Cave Spider Desert Griffon Desert Griffon
White Jade Armor Jade Armor Harpy Ranger Harpy Ranger Cloudtouched Simian Cloudtouched Simian Dredge Brute Dredge Brute
White Jungle Troll Jungle Troll Heket Warrior Heket Warrior Forest Minotaur Forest Minotaur Krait Neoss Krait Neoss
White Necrid Horseman Necrid Horseman Juggernaut Juggernaut Irukandji Irukandji Kveldulf Kveldulf
White Siege Turtle Siege Turtle Mandragor Imp Mandragor Imp Mursaat Mursaat Quetzal Sly Quetzal Sly
White Temple Guardian Temple Guardian Thorn Wolf Thorn Wolf Raptor Raptor Terrorweb Dryder Terrorweb Dryder
White Whiptail Devourer Whiptail Devourer Wind Rider Wind Rider Roaring Ether Roaring Ether Word of Madness Word of Madness

Other In-Game Sources

Icon Name Color Availability
Black Moa Chick Black Moa Chick1 Green
Dhuum Dhuum Green
Greased Lighting Greased Lightning Green
Mallyx Mallyx Green
Ghostly Hero Ghostly Hero Green
Gwen Doll Gwen Doll Green
Yakkington Yakkington Green
Brown Rabbit Brown Rabbit1 Gold
Pig Pig Gold
Celestial Pig Celestial Pig Gold
Celestial Rat Celestial Rat Gold
Celestial Ox Celestial Ox Gold
Polar Bear Polar Bear Gold
Smite Crawler Smite Crawler Gold

Other

Icon Name Color Availability
Kuunavang Kuunavang Green
  • Factions Collectors Edition
Varesh Varesh Ossa Green
  • Nightfall Collectors Edition
Vizu Vizu Green
Kanaxai Kanaxai Green
  • Guild Wars Championship in Japan #1 team (up to 8 members)
  • Taiwan region Nightfall title contest prizes (6 were given)
  • Taiwan region friend introduction event prizes (12 were given)
  • 1st prize in the Wintersday 2007 Art Contest.
Mad King's Guard Mad King's Guard Gold
Gray Giant Gray Giant Gold
Ceratadon Ceratadon Gold
  • Obtained by downloading the MMOZine #1. Only the first 40,000 people to download the magazine could obtain one.
Asura Asura Gold
Destroyer Destroyer of Flesh Gold
  • North America: Special issue of PC Gamer on September the 25th. [3]
  • Finalist prize in the Wintersday 2007 Art Contest. (up to 15 prizes)
  • Europe: In exchange for a duplicate Mini Asura keycode2
Shiroken Assassin Shiro'ken Assassin Gold
  • Japan netcafe promotion lucky draw (40 prizes)
  • Taiwan GW official blog lucky draw (10 prizes)
  • Europe: Rare miniature found in magazines across Europe. (20 prizes)
  • North America: Rare minature found in Mini Madness promotion (45 prizes)
Zhed Zhed Shadowhoof Gold
  • Japan netcafe promotion lucky draw (40 prizes)
  • Taiwan GW official blog lucky draw (10 prizes)
  • Europe: Rare miniature found in magazines across Europe. (20 prizes)
  • North America: Rare minature found in Mini Madness promotion (45 prizes)
Island Guardian Island Guardian Gold
  • Guild Wars Championship in Japan top 3 teams (up to 8 members each)
  • Taiwan region, 50~99th signup to help newbies during first two weeks of Nightfall retail (50 were given)
  • Taiwan region Nightfall title contest prizes (61 were given)
  • 3rd prize in the Wintersday 2007 Art Contest.
Panda Panda Gold
  • Guild Wars Championship in Japan top 2 teams (up to 8 members each)
  • Taiwan region, 1~49th signup during first two weeks of Nightfall retail (49 were given)
  • Taiwan region Nightfall title contest prizes (61 were given)
  • Taiwan region GW 1st anniversary wallpaper contest prizes (10 total)
Grawl Grawl Purple
  • North America: Unlock keys handed out at Comic-Con, Gen Con, and Penny Arcade Expo in July/August 2007. ArenaNet Party 08/30/2008.
  • Europe: Common miniature found in magazines across Europe. (650 prizes)
  • Finalist prize in the Wintersday 2007 Art Contest. (up to 15 prizes)
Longhair Yeti Longhair Yeti Purple
  • Japanese netcafe promotion (500 were given through lucky draw) Official page
  • Taiwan region Nightfall preview event GM game winning prizes (250 were given)
  • Taiwan region Nightfall title contest prizes (61 were given)
  • Taiwan GW official blog lucky draw (10 prizes)
  • Brand the Bosses (2007) contest (98 awarded)
  • Europe: Uncommon miniature found in magazines across Europe. (100 prizes)
  • North America: Uncommon minature found in Mini Madness promotion (90 prizes)
  • Honorable mention prize in the Wintersday 2007 Art Contest. (3 prizes)
Naga Raincaller Naga Raincaller Purple
  • Japanese netcafe promotion (500 were given through lucky draw)
  • Taiwan region Nightfall preview event GM game winning prizes (250 were given)
  • Taiwan region Nightfall title contest prizes (61 were given)
  • Taiwan GW official blog lucky draw (10 prizes)
  • Brand the Bosses (2007) contest (1 awarded)
  • Europe: Uncommon miniature found in magazines across Europe. (100 prizes)
  • North America: Uncommon minature found in Mini Madness promotion (90 prizes)
Oni Oni Purple
  • Japanese netcafe promotion (500 were given through lucky draw)
  • Taiwan region Nightfall title contest prizes (61 were given)
  • Taiwan GW official blog lucky draw (11 prizes)
  • Brand the Bosses (2007) contest
  • Europe: Uncommon miniature found in magazines across Europe. (100 prizes)
  • North America: Uncommon minature found in Mini Madness promotion (90 prizes)

1 The Black Moa Chick, the Brown Rabbit and the White Rabbit are the only Miniatures whose names do not start with Miniature because they are actual size.

2 In both France and Germany, two different magazines distributed codes for a Miniature Asura at different times: the May '07 Joystick and the November '07 PCJeux in France; and the May '07 PC Games and the October '07 GameStar Special in Germany. In both countries, if a player purchased both magazines, the extra code could be exchanged for a Miniature Destroyer.

Gaile Gray's Frogs

These are unique miniatures owned exclusively by Gaile Gray, given to her by the developer team in recognition of her long-time service as ArenaNet's Community Relations Manager.

Frog FrogHalloween FrogWintersday
The Frog
 
The Frog
(Halloween)
The Frog
(Wintersday)

Notes

Miniature/Birthday Doll with a name and level in an outpost.
Miniature Birthday Doll with a name and party icon in an outpost.
Shield assigned to Miniature Gwen.
  • While the color of the miniature is indicative of its rarity within each annual series, the rarity does not always carry over to non-birthday present miniatures. Be sure to check current market conditions when buying or selling a miniature.
  • Some minipets make sounds whenever they are in an explorable area in PvE, eg. mini Jungle Troll.
  • Since the 2007 Canthan New Year Festival, birthday dolls have been seen in outposts with levels of their own, a party icon of anywhere from two to eight, and a name under the miniature itself.
  • Due to the massive duplication exploit of 2007, users who bought rare minis with duplicated items were banned. Therefore, many rare minis were deleted from the game permanently; it is unknown how many minipets were deleted from the game this way.
  • There are currently 89 different Miniatures in existence, but only 86 are obtainable by players, as all three unique Frogs were given to Gaile Gray.
  • Minis have been observed having drops assigned to them. The owner of the mini is able to pick up the drop.

External Links

The color of the ◄ ► encasing a group of minis indicates their text color.
Facts about MiniatureRDF feed

This article uses material from the "Miniature" article on the Guild Wars wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Starwars

Up to date as of February 04, 2010
(Redirected to Category:Toys article)

From Wookieepedia, the Star Wars wiki.

This is a category of Star Wars-related toys.

Subcategories

This category has only the following subcategory.

L

Pages in category "Toys"

The following 7 pages are in this category, out of 7 total.

B

D

G

K

L

M

T


This article uses material from the "Category:Toys" article on the Starwars wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Transformers

Up to date as of February 05, 2010

From Teletraan I: The Transformers Wiki

The Air Military Team from Armada. The gimmicks: micro-size, ability to "powerlinx" with larger toys, triple-changing, being awesome.

In contrast to most science fiction franchises, toys are the core of the Transformers brand, its original reason for being. Most Transformers fiction exists to showcase, spotlight, promote, and in general to sell toys. Merchandise and other non-transforming "artifacts" also generally exist in support of the toy lines.

Transformers toys are generally created and marketed as part of a particular "franchise" (i.e. Beast Wars, Armada, the retroactively-named Generation One etc.), a whole merchandising family with associated characters and fiction. However, this article deals with the physical toys themselves, separate from their representation as fictional characters.

Since the brand debuted in 1984, innumerable Transformer toys have been designed, manufactured and marketed. An exact count is difficult due to the varied nature of the toys (for example, does a Headmaster robot and its partner mini-figure count as one Transformer or two? What about minor retools and running changes?) But even conservative estimates by collectors tend to run into the low thousands.

Contents

Design

Where the hell do you KEEP that enormous cannon, Megatron?

Most Transformers are designed as a joint venture between Hasbro in America, and TakaraTomy (previously Takara) in Japan. Hasbro typically provides concepts and artistic direction, while Takara(Tomy) handles the engineering tasks of turning the designs into working physical objects. This division of labor is not cut-and-dried, however; the process involves a great deal of back-and-forth communication between the two companies, with staff members from both working in close conjunction and corresponding on a daily basis. The teams travel overseas several times a year to meet in person, alternating between Japan and Rhode Island. The relationship has grown closer and more intense over the years; the two companies now plan their futures together, compromising along the way to meet the differing requirements of their target markets; this includes not only to toy designs, but associated storylines as well. [1]

Design concepts for an unproduced Classics Cosmos. If Hasbro makes this, fans will have their babies.

The toy design process begins with a range of character types and possible alternate modes. In the days of Beast Wars, for example, a range of about 100 animal forms was considered.[2]

Nearly all Transformers toys have a minimum of two forms, most commonly a humanoid "robot" form and an alternate mode. This means that even a fairly simple Transformer is much more complex than the typical action figure. Multiple alternate modes, articulation, and complex transformations can multiply this many times over. TakaraTomy works out the transformation schemes; as of 2002, Takara still did this on paper. Hasbro would then overlay their detailing designs on the drawings. The entire process of taking a toy from concept to finished, mass-produced product takes approximately one year.[3]

Because of their worldwide marketing, Transformers must be designed to meet many widely-varying safety laws. This often results in certain limitations, and even changes being made before toys are sold in the highly litigious United States of America compared to their Japanese releases.

Related articles:

Components

Gone are the days when the instructions said, "Flip out rear of vehicle to form legs; pull out arms."

Transformer toys contain a "vocabulary" of working parts, joint types, and standardized design items that reappear across many figures. The vast majority are humanoid in their robot mode, and thus require a head, (at least) two arms, two legs and a torso.

The complexity of Transformers toys has grown over time, making several leaps forward during the course of Generation 2 and Beast Wars, and then again during the Movie line. G2 introduced complex posability and the notion of toys that could store or hold all of their accessories in both modes; Beast Wars made these concepts universal, and featured a number of toys with extremely complicated transformations and a maximum number of ball joints, providing a huge range of articulation. Other toy lines would revisit these levels of complexity, particularly Robots in Disguise and Alternators.

Related articles:



Production/Manufacturing

Prototype Hot Shot really likes JaAm!!

Though the toys are designed in America and Japan through a collaborative process between Takara and Hasbro, most are manufactured in places like China.

The production process is complex and expensive. Before mass production can begin, a hard-copy prototype must be created. Steel-cut molds can then be made; this is by far the most costly part of the process. Once the molds are cut, one or more test shots are typically created, usually in random colors. If the molds are ready, mass production commences.

The expense of cutting molds is the main reason that retools and recolors are such a common phenomena in Transformers. Recolors allow Hasbro and TakaraTomy to capture a greater return on their considerable investment.


Related articles:

Materials

Tracks from the Alternators/Binaltech line. The Japanese version uses die-cast metal for added heft, while the American iteration is all-plastic for added being-able-to-stand-up.

The vast majority of the toys are made of plastic, held together with metal screws and pins, along with the occasional adhesive. The plastics used in Transformer construction have generally increased in flexibility and durability over the years, allowing toys to survive child-inflicted trauma that would have destroyed early Generation One toys.

Die-cast, used as an accessory material from 1984-1986, has been all but abandoned due to its excessive cost, shipping weight and design limitations, though it has reappeared in the fan-oriented Binaltech and Titanium Series sublines.

Related articles:


Common gimmicks

Not much articulation, but man, can he scoot across your kitchen floor.

As if Transformers weren't complicated enough, Hasbro has seen fit to revitalize and enhance the line constantly with numerous special features, commonly referred to in the fandom as gimmicks. These may range from things as simple as a common decorative theme (such as vacuum metalizing on the Transmetal toys) to complex mechanisms that drive the entire design of a toy. Gimmicks have been a part of Transformers from Day 1 and continue to provide the line with diversity and interest today.

Main article: Gimmicks

Static gimmicks

Active gimmicks

Decoration

OTFCC-exclusive Sentinel Maximus, a toy heavily slathered in paint applications.

Most Transformers are cast in a limited number of plastic colors. To help bring them to life, paint, tampographs, and stickers are commonly used to provide additional color.

Stickers were common during the days of Generation One, but have mostly dropped out of use due to changing aesthetic tastes and the feasibility of more complex paint operations. Today, faction symbols are typically applied via tampograph, with most other details brought out by paint applications.

Related articles:

Marketing

In the market-driven rush to production, sometimes the wires get a little crossed. This package cross-sell presents other toys in the line... in color schemes that were never mass-produced. Oops!

As awesome as the toys themselves may be, they tend to sell better when they represent fictional characters. The marketing engine that promotes the toys is organized into franchises, each encompassing a range of related toys with a storyline built around them. A full-blown, flagship franchise typically features an animated cartoon, and often a comic book series as well. These fictional portrayals may also be a source of considerable income for Hasbro/TakaraTomy, but ultimately they exist to sell toys.

The toy packaging also commonly supports the marketing effort, with biographies and package art of the characters, as well as cross-sell ads promoting other toys currently available. Inside the packaging, catalogs and pack-in flyers further market other toys.

Related articles:

Distribution and retail

Packaging! It's elegant, sleek, attractive, and lasts for about five seconds.

Once the toys are manufactured and packaged, they are shipped from their place of birth in Asia to America. As of 1998, their first destination is a Seattle distribution warehouse. From there, they proceed to the distribution centers for the various chain stores that sell the toys at retail; at that point, control of distribution is out of Hasbro's hands. On average, it takes six to eight weeks from the time the toys ship from Hasbro to their appearance on retail shelves. [2]

Toy retailers do their best to predict what toys will and won't sell, and order accordingly; however, it is an imperfect process, and slow sellers in one wave of toys can compel a retailer to order fewer toys from the following waves. Retailers are particularly reluctant to order large numbers from the tail-end of a toy line. [1]

Today, the largest distributors of Transformer toys in America are Wal*Mart, Target, and Toys "R" Us, though the toys can also be found at many other stores such Meijer, Kmart, KB Toys, Kohl's, and Walgreens, as well as various regional grocery and drug store chains.

Related articles:

Secondary market

In Transformers fandom, "secondary market" refers to the buying and selling of used toys. The original, stereotypical secondary market was the old-fashioned garage sale — you know, the one where your mom sold all your G1 toys for ten bucks while you were off in college.

The secondary market among fans began with internet auctions, primarily on alt.toys.transformers in the early 1990s. By the late '90s, ATT's primacy as a marketplace had been supplanted by eBay and various fan-run sites. Buyers and sellers also found a bonanza of opportunities at BotCon, with thousands of toys changing hands over the course of a weekend.

Like any economic market, the secondary market has a life of its own. Older toys can be worth hundreds of dollars, depending on their condition, rarity, and popularity, or they may be worth next to nothing. Most toys from Beast Wars and later franchises tend to be of comparatively lower value, as many adult fans were buying the toys when they were at retail, and have since kept them in pristine or even unopened condition.

Related artcles:

Toy aging

Split open and melt.

Transformer toys are, to put it bluntly, not meant to last forever. They are marketed to a fleeting and transitory age group, with the notion that if they survive a few years, their work is done. Thus collectors who have retained Generation One toys for many years can find some unexpected surprises as their toys age, regardless of how carefully the toys have been stored. Among the most common problems are:


External links

  1. 1.0 1.1 Steve-o Stonebraker's Botcon 2005 notes
  2. 2.0 2.1 A guy on the Internet
  3. Some random web site

This article uses material from the "Toy" article on the Transformers wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Yugioh

Up to date as of February 05, 2010

From Yu-Gi-Oh!

Toys are cards that have the word "toy" in their name and resemble toys that children play with. So far only "Toy Magician" has been released as a real card. Other wise the Toy card set is Manga/Anime/Video Game only.

Jean-Louis Bonaparte from Yu-Gi-Oh! GX plays a "Toy Deck" which seems to be base on quick summoning, direct attacks, and powering up your Toy monsters.

Facts about ToyRDF feed

This article uses material from the "Toy" article on the Yugioh wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.







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