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Muppet

Up to date as of February 02, 2010

From Muppet Wiki

Brad Paisley with Kermit

Target is a discount retail chain. They have carried exclusive Muppet merchandise over the years, as well as featuring Kermit in an advertising campaign.

Contents

Promotions

  • 2005: In November, Kermit appeared in several advertisements for Target's wake-up calls designed to promote their two-day sale beginning on the morning of what has become known in the U.S. as "Black Friday," the biggest holiday shopping day of the year which follows Thanksgiving Day. Some of the commercials with Kermit also featured Brad Paisley and Carolyn Murphy.
  • 2007: A Christmas shopping ad aired throughout the holiday season featuring Elmo popping out of an advent-like calendar with several other franchise characters such as R2-D2, promoting, among other prizes, the chance to win a trip to Sesame Street.
  • 2009: An exclusive Big Bird puppet is added to Target's previously exclusive line of Fisher-Price Sesame Street puppets, though this one remains a Target exclusive.

Exclusives

  • Fraggle Rock Kids' Double Play
  • Elmo and Friends: Tales of Adventure
  • Elmo's World: Happy Holidays! gift pack with plush
  • Elmo and Friends: The Letter Quest and Other Magical Tales

Connections

See also

Wikipedia has an article related to:
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This article uses material from the "Target" article on the Muppet wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Fallout

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From The Vault

Fallout Tactics characters project
This article is within the scope of the Fallout Tactics characters project. This project is dedicated to adding missing and improving existing Fallout Tactics character articles. If you want to participate, please check the project page.
Target
Biography
race: Human
affiliation: Tribals, Midwestern Brotherhood of Steel
role: Recruit
rank: Squire
Gameplay
appearances: Fallout Tactics
Statistics
SPECIAL: 7 ST, 6 PE, 4 EN, 4 CH, 8 IN, 7 AG, 3 LK
tag skills: Small Guns, Throwing, Sneak
perks: Hit the Deck
level: 5
Technical
actor: None
The following is based on Fallout Tactics and some details might contradict canon.

Target is a recruit in Fallout Tactics.

Background

Target (pronounced tarjay) would have been the winner of the 22nd Appleton "Throw the Spear" contest... except that he was the only contestant to actually kill someone. A judge. Which is why he is now in the Brotherhood.

Availability

Target becomes available after you've reached the rank of Squire.

Appearances

Target appears only in Fallout Tactics.

Recruits of Fallout Tactics

This article uses material from the "Target" article on the Fallout wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Guild Wars

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From GuildWiki

A target is any potential recipient of a skill or attack. The current target is also sometimes called the current selection. A target could be a foe or ally.

Contents

How to target

There are various ways to pick a target:

  • Click the target with your mouse pointer
  • Press (default key) to target ...
    • (T) Last Called Target
    • (F) Self
    • (V) Closest NPC (it also counts henchmen in your party)
    • (C) Closest foe
    • (]) or (Tab) Next foe
    • ([) or (Shift+Tab) Previous foe

Regarding next/previous foe targeting: A list comprised of foes in the area will be generated, in the order of nearest to farthest from the player, when the "target next foe" or "target previous foe" key is first pressed. Subsequently pressing "target next foe" or "target previous foe" will follow this list, regardless of how the position of the character relative to these targets changes, unless (C) "target closest foe" is pressed to reset the order. This means that a player could press target nearest foe as soon as a group of enemies came into range, after which pressing target nearest foe again will cycle through the foes in the order previously generated even if the foes were to jumble up their distances from the player. If the player were to then press (C) "target closest foe", the order of list will update in the order of nearest to farthest from the player. As foes die they are skipped in the list, and as new foes come into range they are added to the end of the list.

Target Monitor

The Target Monitor is the part of the GUI that shows you the status of your current target:

Per default the Target Monitor is located at the center top of the screen.

If no target is shown in the Target Monitor, you target yourself.

Calling targets

You can announce your current target to your party by holding down [CTRL] and

  • Double clicking on the target/target monitor, or pressing space.
    • As you attack your target, text will show up in the team chat channel saying "I am attacking <target name>."
  • Activating a skill that targets the current foe.
    • As you use said skill on the target, text will show up in the team chat channel saying "I'm using <skill name> on <target name>!"
  • Holding down [Shift] and double clicking on the target/target monitor or pressing space
    • You will continue your previous action while text appears in the team chat channel saying "I'm targetting <target name>." This allows you to call a target without actively attacking, which can be useful to avoid aggro or giving away a spike.

Party members may then press [T] (default key) to target the called target.


For more details, see Calling.

Skill target types

Skills use different types of targets. Every skill description will specify the applicable target type:

  • Corpse: The body of a creature after its death. Corpse Exploitation skills and Resurrection skills target corpses. Example: Well of Blood
  • Creature: Everything that appears as a dot or triangle on the minimap, red or green alike. This includes all of the types listed below, even animal wildlife and NPCs. Example: Heal Area
    • Fleshy Creature: Any creature that is a being of flesh and blood. Some creatures (for example Elementals and some Undead) have no flesh. Although not all skill descriptions mention it, all skills which must target fleshy targets must also target foes. Example: Rotting Flesh
    • Ally: Any friendly creature, i.e. anything that appears as a green dot or triangle on the minimap. This includes everybody listed in the party window, as well as friendly animals or NPCs (green on the radar). Example: Healing Breeze
      • Other Ally: Any Ally (as described above), except the skill user himself. Example: Heal Other
      • Party (Member): Everybody listed in the "Party" window, including the skill user himself. This does not include allies (listed under "Allies" in the party window) like pets and minions. Example: Heal Party
    • Foe: Any non-friendly creature, i.e. anything that appears as a red dot or triangle on the minimap. Example: Amity
    • Summoned Creature: Any creature summoned or animated through skills. Example: Banish
      • Animated Undead: All minions (animated bones) animated by Necromancers from corpses. Example: Taste of Death
        • Hostile Animated Undead: Any foe's minions or masterless minions. Example: Verata's Aura
        • Ally Animated Undead, Undead Ally: Any ally's minions (those of the skill user as well as other ally's). Example: Blood of the Master
      • Spirit: Any creature of the Spirit type. Example: Spirit Siphon
        • Allied Spirit: Any ally's spirits (those of the skill user as well as any other ally's). Example: Draw Spirit

Auto-targeting

As of the June 15 2007 update, offensive skills and attacks may automatically select the nearest valid target if one wasn't selected manually, if there is one available on screen. This effect can be toggled in the General Options panel (F11) via the checkbox labelled "Auto-target foes when there's no chosen target".

Targeting notes

  • Activating a skill on an incorrect target will not invoke the skill. Instead the skill will refuse to activate at no cost with the message Invalid Target.
  • Skills that are beneficial (like healing spells and Enchantments) will not cast on enemies. If the player is targeting an enemy and casts a beneficial spell it will cast on the player unless the player is not a possible target (like a skill that targets other allies).
  • Area of Effect (AoE) skills need a target (ally or foe, depending on skill) before they can be invoked, but once invoked they remain where the target was and will not follow the target. Point Blank Area of Effect (PBAoE) skills automatically target the caster, but hypocritically these do not count as ally-targeted spells for the purposes of, e.g., Shame. Examples of these include skills that target foes like Meteor Shower, skills that target allies like Balthazar's Aura, and as well as skills that are located at caster's current location (like Symbol of Wrath. There is no location targeting in Guild Wars: a player can only invoke a skill at a location occupied by one of the targets listed above---in short, foe, ally, or self.
Facts about TargetRDF feed

This article uses material from the "Target" article on the Guild Wars wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Runescape

Up to date as of February 07, 2010
(Redirected to Bounty worlds article)

From the RuneScape Wiki, the wiki for all things RuneScape

Bounty Worlds.

Bounty Hunter Worlds (Bounty Worlds, or BW for short) are themed worlds in which PvP combat is allowed in the Wilderness. They were released on 6 May 2009 as the re-work to Bounty Hunter, a minigame designed to replace Wilderness player-killing, which was removed as part of the 10 December 2007 updates. All parts of RuneScape are blocked off to players on these servers, except for Edgeville, the wilderness ditch, Monastery, Grand Exchange and the Wilderness.

Contents

Requirement

Worlds

  • Free-to-play worlds
    • English - 32, 57, 9
    • German - 122
    • French - 72
    • Brazilian - 125
  • Pay-to-play worlds
    • English - 18, 65, 124, 137
    • German - None
    • French - None
    • Brazilian - None

Getting started

When players log into a Bounty World, they will get a warning message that they may lose all their items if they die. There is an option to go back to the main screen and choose another world.

Please note: you will not be able to log into a Bounty Hunter World unless your account is stationed in Edgeville, Grand Exchange or Wilderness prior to trying to log into the world.

The first time players enter a Bounty World, they will receive a Bounty worlds manual, which outlines how a Bounty World works. If players lose the manual, Mandrith in the Edgeville bank can give another.

Messages which appear after the first login into a Bounty World. Players will unlock all 3 Bounty Hunter tracks if they were not unlocked previously in the old Bounty Hunter.

Limited area

In order to ensure that each world's player-versus-player zone is busy, only a small number of worlds are available at the moment. In addition, unlike other types of worlds, only Edgeville and the area north of the town are accessible. An expansion to the land also occurred when players were complaining about having to go to a different world to go to the grand exchange, so it was also added to the area.

Teleportation

  • Within Bounty Worlds, most teleports redirect you to Edgeville. It was updated from not having any teleports leading out of the Wilderness or Edgeville to this on the 16 June 2009 update.
  • Upon death, players are returned to Edgeville rather than their normal respawn point.
  • The Ring of life can teleport players to Edgeville.
  • Other forms of teleportation include the Ancient Magicks teleports, the Amulet of glory teleport to Edgeville, and the Ring of duelling teleport to the Fist of Guthix arena.
  • The Mage Arena bank and other areas in the Wilderness which are not Hot zones are considered as Safe Zones.

Wilderness level

Similar to the old Wilderness (before 10 December 2007), players that one can fight are determined by the level of the Wilderness that one is in. Because of this system on Bounty Worlds, players have a larger chance to be left alone when trying to gain Earning Potential. Only people close to that player's level can attack him/her compared to a PvP World where there is a range of 15 levels between a player and the highest or lowest person allowed to attack them. (Ex. if a player is a level 70 then the highest level to attack that person would be a level 85 and the lowest would be a 55 on a PvP World)

Targets

As per the previous Bounty Hunter system, players may be assigned targets. These are assigned after 30 minutes in a combat zone providing there are players of suitable combat levels and one has been without a target for 60 minutes.

In the upper-right hand corner of the screen there is now a bulls-eye which has eight clicks, each click worth 7.5 minutes.

After 60 minutes without a target, the system uses a more wide searching method to find a target that has at least 1/2 of the bulls-eye completed. Unlike the old system, players will become targets themselves. After players have killed their targets, they must wait at least 30 minutes for a new target.

When you get a target and a yellow flashing arrow, telling you where your target is, you will become a target yourself. When you fight your "target", and win, you will receive a better reward (than rogues) as a drop, food, armour, weapons, and Ancient Artefacts. These Ancient Artefacts can be sold to Mandrith in the Edgeville bank for different cash amounts ranging from 5,000 coins to 5,000,000 coins. When you kill your target, you should get 1 to 5 Artefacts.

If the player's target is in single-combat and already fighting someone else, the player can disrupt the battle and attack the target. In addition, if players do not do enough damage to gain the drop, but they die, they will remain a target.

If you are skulled, or attack another player without them attacking you first risking your items, you will fetch an even greater reward. "EP" also comes into your drop. It will increase your chances of a more rare drop, to raise this you have to either, stay in the bounty world for a long time risking a lot of coins, or die losing high amounts of coins, 75k (Used to be 25k). When you or your opponent defeats each other, with no one interrupting the battle, such as someone attacking either player and killing them, you will lose your target and have to wait another 30 minutes before you get another target.

Rewards

Bounty Hunter's drop system is based on that of PvP worlds, but if you kill your target, your reward will be increased by 1 hours worth of hot zone potential and is 3 times more likely to contain actual items from your targets inventory. A target kill scores 1 point on the "Bounty Hunter" hiscores.

Fighting and killing someone who is not the player's target means that they will be rewarded with a random drop from the PvP worlds system, as well as earning them one point on the "Bounty Hunter Rogues" hiscores, but the drops are unlikely to be as valuable.

It is also possible for a rogue to receive part of a player's drop, but this is less likely than if the player's target was killed.

+1 Item

On 17 July, 2009, Jagex introduced the +1 item system for Bounty Worlds. This was designed to stop 1 itemers but also allowing them to keep their most valuable item if they died.

In order to participate, one is required to risk 75,000 coins, (or 25,000 coins on a free world). Because you always keep your most valuable item on these worlds, this means you have to risk 75,000 coins worth of items (25,000 coins on F2P servers) in ADDITION to your always-protected item.

This maintains the following advantages:

  1. It still achieves the original intentions of making it harder to gain drop potential and participate in rewarding combat without actually really risking something.
  2. It stops high-value weapons being made worthless and still maintains that type of game play for people who enjoy it.
  3. Conversely, people who feel the new, more powerful weapons unbalanced PKing, without any risk to the wielder, have a different type of world that they can enjoy too.

Glitches

  • If a player died from poison and was not in combat at the time, they would keep ALL their items upon death. This glitch was patched hours after its discovery.
  • Your "bounty" will drop his or her most valuable items upon death (if you dealt the most damage), unlike regular non-bounty fights.
  • Near the end of the Wilderness ditch in Edgeville to the west, there was a small spot which when ran into, would teleport the person back to Edgeville. Many people used it to escape death. This was patched around a week after initial release.

Trivia

  • Players could run out of the Bounty World area by opening an interface while they ran outside the area. This has been fixed; players will teleport to a spot just south of the Wilderness Ditch upon attempting this.
  • Players could stand on a wall spot by running behind a specific bush and clicking on "House options" in the Options interface. If items were dropped there, they would appear to stick through the head of the player.
  • On Bounty Worlds, all teleport spells take you to Edgeville, unless the spell takes you into a place in the wilderness, such as Ancient Spells, or certain Lunar Spells, such as Ice Plateau Teleport.
  • Many players frequently complain that there should be access to the Grand Exchange due to the fact that they have to switch to a non-Bounty World. On 17 September 2009, Jagex had increased the boundaries for players to access the Grand Exchange.
  • Upon entering a Bounty World, if you had one of the bounty level songs but not the other ones, you will get a message saying that you got all three of them.
  • It is extremely common for players to be wearing a team-cape, with the digit 6 at the end. Because Richard the cape seller is just below the wilderness ditch. Red (Team-Cape 46) is currently the most common.

This article uses material from the "Bounty worlds" article on the Runescape wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Starwars

Up to date as of February 04, 2010
(Redirected to Rebel Force: Target article)

From Wookieepedia, the Star Wars wiki.

Rebel Force: Target
Attribution
Author(s)

Alex Wheeler

Cover artist

Randy Martinez

Publication information
Publisher

Scholastic

Release date

December 2, 2008

Media type

Paperback

Pages

186

ISBN

0545106125

Chronology
Era

Rebellion era

Timeline

0 ABY

Series

Rebel Force

Preceded by

Destroy the Liquidator

Followed by

Hostage

Target is the first installment of the Rebel Force series. It was written by Alex Wheeler and was released in December 2008.

Contents

Publisher's summary

The Death Star has been destroyed. But back at the Rebel base, the celebration is over. The Alliance has intercepted a coded transmission, indicating that the Empire is determined to discover which pilot was responsible for the destruction of the Death Star. New security protocol is in effect: The details of the Death Star mission are now top secret, and no one is to know that Luke fired the decisive shot.

But that's hardly the Alliance's only problem. Almost all their finances were lost with the destruction of Alderaan -- and they are out of money. Their last hope is to access the secret accounts on Muunilinst, the former home of the InterGalactic Banking Clan, and the financial heart of the galaxy. So Luke, Leia, Han, Chewbacca, and the droids head for Muunilinst.

The Empire's top assassin will be waiting for them.

Appearances

By type
Characters Creatures Droid models Events Locations
Organizations and titles Sentient species Vehicles and vessels Weapons and technology Miscellanea

Characters


Creatures

Droid models

Events

Locations

Organizations and titles

Sentient species

Vehicles and vessels

Weapons and technology

Miscellanea

Food and beverages

Notes and references

  1. On few pages novel accidentally mistakes hyperspace for hyperdrive

External links


This article uses material from the "Rebel Force: Target" article on the Starwars wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

The Third Turn

Up to date as of February 05, 2010

From The Third Turn, a Wikia wiki

Target is a large U.S retail store selling:Clothing, House accessories, Electronics, etc. They sponsor the #41 Chip Ganassi Racing Dodge.


This article uses material from the "Target" article on the The Third Turn wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Yugioh

Up to date as of February 05, 2010

From Yu-Gi-Oh!

When an effect targets, it chooses at the time of activation the specific card(s) that it will affect.

You must declare the target before players are allowed to chain to the effect. If another effect is chained to the original effect so that the target is not a legal target when resolving the original effect, then you do not get to "re-select" the target. The original effect resolves without effect (that is, it does nothing).

Equip Spell Cards always target the monster which is being equipped.

Cards like "Dark Hole", "Mirror Force", "Lightning Vortex" and "Raigeki" do not target, because the player does not specify which cards will be affected - rather, it destroys all monster, regardless of whether or not the monsters were on the field at activation. Likewise, "Fissure" and "Magical Dimension" do not target, because they select the monster to be destroyed when you are resolving the effect.

Effects that automatically choose what they are going to affect, like "Drillroid" or "D.D. Warrior Lady", usually do not target. Most Counter Trap Cards do not target for the same reason - most can only affect the effect directly beneath it in the Chain, so there is no selection, so the effect does not target.

If the card's text says "target", then the effect almost always targets. If the card's text says "select", then the effect usually targets, although there are some exceptions. When in doubt, check the card's rulings to see whether or not it targets.

Facts about TargetRDF feed

This article uses material from the "Target" article on the Yugioh wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

YCM

Up to date as of February 06, 2010

From Yu-Gi-Oh Card Maker Wiki

When an effect targets, it chooses at the time of activation the specific card(s) that it will affect.

You must declare the target before players are allowed to chain to the effect. If another effect is chained to the original effect so that the target is not a legal target when resolving the original effect, then you do not get to "re-select" the target. The original effect resolves without effect (that is, it does nothing).

Example: Player A activates "Offerings to the Doomed" and targets "Dark Magician". Player B chains "Book of Moon", targeting the same "Dark Magician". "Book of Moon" resolves first, and changes "Dark Magician" to face-down Defense Position. Then, when "Offerings to the Doomed" resolves, "Dark Magician" is not destroyed - "Offerings to the Doomed" can only target face-up monsters, and "Dark Magician" is face-down, so "Offerings to the Doomed" resolves without effect. You do not get to select a new monster to destroy. Example: Player A attacks with The Tricky. Player B activates Draining Shield. Draining Shield targets because it selects The Tricky's attack to negate. If Player A activates Trap Jammer, then Draining Shield resolves without effect and cannot be set back. Equip Spell Cards always target the monster which is being equipped.

Cards like "Dark Hole", "Mirror Force", "Lightning Vortex" and "Raigeki" do not target, because the player does not specify which cards will be affected - rather, it destroys all monster, regardless of whether or not the monsters were on the field at activation. Likewise, "Fissure" and "Magical Dimension" do not target, because they select the monster to be destroyed when you are resolving the effect.

Effects that automatically choose what they are going to affect, like "Drillroid" or "D.D. Warrior Lady", usually do not target. Most Counter Trap Cards do not target for the same reason - most can only affect the effect directly beneath it in the Chain, so there is no selection, so the effect does not target.

If the card's text says "target", then the effect almost always targets. If the card's text says "select", then the effect usually targets, although there are some exceptions. When in doubt, check the card's rulings to see whether or not it targets.

Facts about TargetRDF feed

This article uses material from the "Target" article on the YCM wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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