Statistics: Misc

  
  
  
  

EQ2

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From EQ2i, the EverQuest II wiki

#REDIRECT Special:Statistics

This article uses material from the "Statistics" article on the EQ2 wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Fallout

Up to date as of February 01, 2010
(Redirected to Statistic article)

From The Vault

Disambiguation
This disambiguation page lists articles that might otherwise share the same title.
If an article link led you here, please change the link to point directly to the intended page.

Statistic can refer to:


This article uses material from the "Statistic" article on the Fallout wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

GTA

Up to date as of February 09, 2010

From Grand Theft Wiki


Statistics are used in GTA III Era games to indicate progression in certain areas, or to enumerate certain activities -- for example, a "Longest wheelie" statistic will measure how long a player has sustained a wheelie on a motorcycle; "Packages collected" counts how many Hidden Packages a player has acquired; "Hospital visits" counts how many times a player has been Wasted on their current playthrough, etc.

Many of these statistics are also present in older GTA games, but they are not detailed here.

HUD Stats

Rather than recording progress or activities, these statistics are displayed onscreen during gameplay in the Heads Up Display (HUD), to give the player a greater awareness of the protagonist's condition and situation.

  • Health - Health indicates the player's condition, and as such, is reduced by sustaining injuries. When the player's health is depleted, they are Wasted, which results in mission failure, and the player being sent to hospital to be revived. Health can be regained by eating food, saving, or picking up a health "power-up" or first-aid kit.
  • Armor - Armor counts as an extra "layer" of health; it can be acquired via an Armor pickup, purchased at an Ammu-Nation store, or, in some games, acquired by entering the Police Enforcer. The exact abilities of Armor vary from game to game -- generally, Armor will absorb all gunfire and explosive damage until it is entirely depleted; damage from falls and vehicle impacts may deplete Armor, or may leave Armor intact and deplete Health. In Vice City, shotgun attacks can reduce health as well as depleting armor.
  • Wanted Level - The Wanted Level indicates the level of police interest in the player. If the player commits serious crimes (and the police are aware of them), it will indicate the extent of the crimes, and how much force Police will employ in capturing (or killing) the player. If the police catch the player, he or she will be Busted.

GTA SA Statistics

GTA San Andreas has a number of additional statistics, viewable either by holding the 'status' button or key, or via the Main Menu. These reflect CJ's physique, physical abilities and expertise; unlike in other GTA games, these change according to the player's actions.

  • Fat - This statistic measures CJ's body fat. Fat is increased by eating food. Fat is decreased by exercising, either at a gym or in the world at large. Being overweight naturally changes CJ's appearance, and eventually lessens most physical capabilities (including health), but CJ is required to have at least a small amount of fat -- without it, exercising will reduce CJ's health instead of his fat.
Food is available at Well Stacked Pizza Co., Cluckin' Bell, and Burger Shot, and their meals will add either 0, 1, 2, or 3% to CJ's Fat level.
For every 150 seconds of running, or every 100 seconds of biking or swimming, CJ will shed 1.5% fat. At a gym, this is much faster - on the treadmill or stationary bike, CJ will shed 2.5% fat every 14 seconds. When lifting weights, CJ will shed 2.5% fat for each repetition. Also, if the player waits 48 ingame hours without eating, CJ will shed fat at a rate of 2.5% per in-game hour. If the player has no more fat to shed, the hunger will start hampering muscle instead.
  • Muscle - This indicates CJ's muscular development. Muscle influences the Respect and Sex Appeal stats. Muscle is increased by working out at a gym, or otherwise exercising (running, riding bikes, swimming). A 100% muscle statistic is detrimental to Sex appeal and will prevent CJ from initiating contact with some girlfriends
Using the treadmill or stationary bike at a gym for 14 seconds will gain 1% muscle. Lifting weights will gain 1% muscle for each repetition. 150 seconds of running in-game, or 100 seconds of swimming or biking, will cause CJ to gain 1% muscle.
  • Respect - Respect indicates CJ's level of influence in the Grove Street Families. Having high enough Respect allows CJ to recruit gang members. Many missions increase Respect when completed, as do successful Gang Wars. Respect is lost by not wearing gang colors in gang territory. CJ will also lose respect if he kills members of his gang, or loses territory to other gangs.
  • Sex Appeal - This statistic indicates how girls will react to CJ. It is influenced by CJ's Vehicle, Hairstyle, Clothing, Fat, and Muscle. Collecting all 50 Oysters can prevent some of the pitfalls of low Sex Appeal (girlfriends being dissatisfied with CJ's appearance, or potential girlfriends not wanting to talk to CJ)
  • Stamina - The Stamina statistic indicates endurance with regards to running, swimming, and cycling. Low stamina means CJ will grow fatigued easily and stop sprinting after short distances. Stamina has to be built up over the course of the entire game by exercising. In GTA: Vice City Stories, a stamina bar also exists whenever the player is in the water. If it runs out, the player will drown.
For every 150 seconds of swimming, or every 300 seconds for running or biking, CJ will gain 5% Stamina. At the Gyms, the treadmill and stationary bike will grant CJ 4% Stamina for every 14 seconds.
  • Oxygen - Oxygen represents how long CJ can hold his breath underwater. An oxygen meter is displayed whenever CJ dives underwater. Lung capacity is increased by swimming underwater for extended periods, and by collecting Oysters.

This article uses material from the "Statistics" article on the GTA wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Ice Hockey

Up to date as of February 02, 2010

An Ice Hockey Wiki article.

Statistics are a very important part of ice hockey.

The following are the most commonly tracked statistics in ice hockey:

Contents

Team statistics

  • GPGames played – Number of games the team has played
  • WWins – Games the team has won, either in regulation or in overtime
  • LLosses – Games the team has lost in regulation
  • TTies – Games that have ended in a tie
  • OTL – Overtime losses – Games the team has lost in overtime (Note: Many leagues do not separate overtime losses and regulation losses, including all losses in the losses statistic)
  • SOLShootout losses – Games the team has lost in a shootout
  • PTSPoints – Team points, calculated from W, L, T, OTL, and SOL; used to determine standings. Most leagues award 2 points for a W and 1 point for a T, OTL, or SOL.
  • GFGoals for – Number of goals the team has scored
  • GAGoals against – Number of goals scored against the team
  • SOShutouts – Number of games the team held the opposition scoreless

Player statistics

  • GPGames played – Number of games the player has set foot on the ice in
  • GGoals – Total number of goals the player has scored
  • AAssists – Number of goals the player has assisted in
  • PTSPoints – Scoring points, calculated as the sum of G and A
  • PIMPenalties infraction minutes – Number of penalty minutes the player has been assessed. For statistical purposes, ten minutes are recorded for a game misconduct, gross misconduct, or match penalty.
  • PPGPower play goals – Number of goals the player has scored while his team was on the power play
  • PPAPower play assists – Number of goals the player has assisted in while his team was on the power play
  • SHGShorthanded goals – Number of goals the player has scored while his team was shorthanded
  • SHAShorthanded assists – Number of goals the player has assisted in while his team was shorthanded
  • GWGGame-winning goals – Number of game-winning goals the player has scored (a goal is considered game winning when the team would win the game without scoring any more goals, for example, the third goal in a 5–2 game)
  • GTGGame-tying goals – Number of game-tying (that is, the last goal scored in a tie game) goals the player has scored
  • ENGEmpty net goals – Number of goals scored on an empty net
  • +/- or P/MPlus/minus – The number of team goals for minus the number of team goals against while the player is on the ice and the teams are at even strength (see plus/minus)
  • TOITime on ice – Total time on ice
  • ATOIAverage time on ice – The average amount of time the player spent on the ice in the games he played (total time on ice divided by games played)
  • Some other penalty terms that are used somewhat less often include hits, faceoff wins, faceoff win percentage, takeaways, giveaways, shots on goal (SOG).

Goaltender statistics

  • GP, G, A – Same as player statistics. Note: +/- is not recorded for goaltenders.
  • GSGames started – The number of games the goaltender has started
  • MIN – Total number of minutes the goaltender has been on the ice
  • GAGoals against – Number of goals scored against the goaltender
  • GAAGoals against average – Mean goals-per-game scored on the goaltender (see goals against average)
  • WWins – Games the goaltender has won
  • LLosses – Games the goaltender has lost (A goaltender is credited with a win or loss when he is either on the ice when – or was pulled for an extra attacker immediately before – the game-winning goal was scored)
  • TTies – Games the goaltender has tied (a goaltender is credited with a tie when he was on the ice for – or was pulled for an extra attacker immediately before – the game-tying goal was scored. In the case of 0–0 ties, the starting goaltender is credited with the tie)
  • SOG – Total number of shots on goal the goaltender has faced
  • SVSaves – Number of shots on goal the goaltender has saved
  • SVP, SV%, or PCTSave percentage – Percentage of the total shots faced the goaltender has saved (see save percentage)
  • SOShutouts – Number of games where the goaltender had no goals against him and was the only goaltender from his team to play in the game
  • ENGEmpty net goals – Number of goals scored while the goaltender was off the ice for an extra attacker

References

  • 2005 NCAA Ice Hockey Statisticians Manual (PDF)

This article uses material from the "Statistics" article on the Ice Hockey wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.







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