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"Shambala"
Artist
Three Dog Night
Released
1973
Songfacts entry

"Shambala", by Three Dog Night, is the song that spontaneously begins playing on the DHARMA van's 8-track tape deck when Hurley starts its engine in "Tricia Tanaka Is Dead". The beginning of the song is also heard earlier in the same episode in a flashback to Hurley's childhood. The song is heard yet again in "The Man Behind the Curtain" when Ben and Roger ride in the van.

The song, written by Daniel Moore in 1973, is the hit version by Three Dog Night. The lyrics reflect the removal of negative emotions of suffering, mirroring Hurley's unwavering goal to convince himself and others to have fun no matter the circumstances, while Shambala itself is a reference to a mythical kingdom of enlightenment in the tradition of Tibetan Buddhism.

To listen to the music click here

Contents

Lyrics

Wash away my troubles, wash away my pain
With the rain in Shambala
Wash away my sorrow, wash away my shame
With the rain in Shambala

Ah, ooh, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah

Everyone is helpful, everyone is kind
On the road to Shambala
Everyone is lucky, everyone is so kind
On the road to Shambala

How does your light shine, in the halls of Shambala

I can tell my sister by the flowers in her eyes
On the road to Shambala
I can tell my brother by the flowers in her eyes
On the road to Shambala

How does your light shine, in the halls of Shambala

Episode

The lyrics that are actually audible in "Tricia Tanaka Is Dead" are:

Ah, ooh, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah
Ah, ooh, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah

Everyone is helpful, everyone is kind
On the road to Shambala
Everyone is lucky, everyone is so kind
On the road to Shambala

Ah, ooh, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah
Ah, ooh, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah

How does your light shine, in the halls of Shambala
How does your light shine, in the halls of Shambala

Trivia

  • "Shambala" is one of three examples in the series where a diegetic song (originating from within story and heard by the characters) is incorporated into the musical score, thereby becoming non-diegetic. After the song comes on in the DHARMA van in "Tricia Tanaka Is Dead", it is integrated into the score for use in the following montage sequence. The other examples of this scoring technique are "La Mer" in "Whatever the Case May Be" and "Downtown" in "One of Us".
  • The lyrics of "Shambala" are very similar to "Wash Away," a song Hurley listened to on his CD player. ("Tabula Rasa")
  • The non-diegetic version of "Shambala" incorporated into the score is featured on the Season 3 soundtrack as track 20 on disc 1, and is called "Shambala".

Unanswered questions

Unanswered questions
  1. Do not answer the questions here.
  2. Keep the questions open-ended and neutral: do not suggest an answer.
More details...
For fan theories about these unanswered questions, see: Shambala/Theories

Is the use of the song intended to imply that The Island itself is a Shambhala or "mythical kingdom of enlightenment?"

External links


This article uses material from the "Shambala" article on the Lostpedia wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.







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