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Sergei Fedorov: Misc

  
  
  

Ice Hockey

Up to date as of February 02, 2010

An Ice Hockey Wiki article.

Position Centre
Shoots Left
Height
Weight
6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
206 lb (94 kg)
NHL Team
F. Teams
Washington Capitals
Columbus Blue Jackets
HC CSKA Moscow
Detroit Red Wings
Mighty Ducks of Anaheim
Nationality Russia
Born December 13 1969 (1969-12-13) (age 40),
Pskov, Soviet Union Flag of Soviet Union
NHL Draft 74th overall, 1989
Detroit Red Wings
Pro Career 1990 – present

Sergei Viktorovich Fedorov (Russian:Сергей Викторович Фёдоров, Sergey Viktorovich Fyodorov; born December 13 1969 in Pskov, Soviet Union; now Russia) is a professional ice hockey forward and occasional defenceman[1] who plays for the Columbus Blue Jackets in the National Hockey League.

Contents

Playing career

Fedorov was drafted by the Detroit Red Wings in the 1989 NHL Entry Draft, fourth round, 74th overall. In his pre-NHL days, he played for CSKA Moscow on a line with future NHL superstars Pavel Bure and Alexander Mogilny and was drafted in the same year as Bure and a year after Mogilny. In 1990, while CSKA Moscow was in Seattle for the Goodwill Games, Fedorov quietly slipped out of his hotel room and onto an airplane bound for Detroit.[2] Thus, he became one of many NHL stars to have defected from the Soviet Union to play in the NHL.

During the 1993-94 NHL season, Fedorov won that year's Hart Memorial Trophy (being the first European-trained player to do so), the Frank J. Selke Trophy, and the Lester B. Pearson Award. He finished second in scoring behind Los Angeles' Wayne Gretzky with 56 goals and 120 points.

Fedorov won another Frank J. Selke Trophy in 1996, after compiling another 100-point season with 39 goals and 107 points. One year later, he was a member of the Red Wings' first Stanley Cup championship team since 1955, contributing 20 points in 20 playoff games for Detroit.

After a lengthy holdout to start the 1997-1998 season, Fedorov, a restricted free-agent, was offered a contract by the Carolina Hurricanes worth up to $38 million (with bonuses). The Red Wings matched the offer on February 26, 1998, ending Fedorov's holdout. The offer broke down as: $14 million for signing, $2 million for 21 regular season games, $12 million for the team reaching conference finals. $28 million for 43 total games in 1997-98 is the largest single season amount paid to an NHL athlete. Fedorov helped the Red Wings win their second consecutive Stanley Cup that year.

On February 18, 1999 Fedorov announced that his entire base salary for the 1998-99 season, $2 million, would be used to create the Sergei Fedorov Foundation, a charity to assist Detroit area children. During the 1990s, Fedorov was third in playoff scoring, with 134 points behind only Jaromir Jagr (135) and Mario Lemieux (136). He is only the 3rd player in NHL history to have four consecutive 20+ point playoff campaigns. (Mike Bossy and Bryan Trottier are the other 2.)

Fedorov won a silver medal with Russia in the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano, and a bronze medal in the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City.

In the 2003 offseason, Fedorov signed with the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim. Fedorov remained with Anaheim between 2003-2005. It was with the Ducks that Fedorov picked up his 1,000th point, becoming the first Russian-born and fifth European-born player to do so.[3] In an unanticipated move, he was traded to the Columbus Blue Jackets on November 15, 2005.[4] Fedorov, as a Blue Jacket, also played his 1,000th NHL game on November 30, 2005, becoming the 13th European-born player to reach 1,000 NHL games and the 205th player overall to do so.[5]

In a 2006 interview, former Red Wing head coach Scotty Bowman said, "[Fedorov was] one of my favorite players as a coach because he can do anything [asked of him on ice]." Bowman coached nine of Fedorov's thirteen seasons with Detroit. During the late 1990s, Bowman experimented by using Fedorov on defense and pairing him with Larry Murphy. The Red Wings senior vice-president Jim Devellano said, "I’m convinced if we left him there, he’d have won a Norris Trophy".[2] Although he was effective playing defense, Fedorov stated that he would rather play up front. This has not prevented current Blue Jackets head coach Ken Hitchcock from moving Fedorov back to defense, however, as Hitchcock, who took over the team mid-season, prepares for next season.

The acrimony created during his 1997-98 holdout led to some hard feelings among some Wings fans, and those feelings were only intensified when he signed his free-agent contract with Anaheim after the Wings lost the first round of the playoffs that year to Anaheim. Fans seemed to take the fact that Anaheim signed him for less than the Red Wings offered him as a personal slap in the face. Fedorov has since become the most consistently-booed player at Joe Louis Arena when his team comes in to play the Red Wings, as fans jeer him every time he touches the puck. Even so, he is fourth all-time in nearly every offensive category in Red Wings history behind Gordie Howe, Steve Yzerman and Alex Delvecchio. Only Howe, Yzerman, Delvecchio and Nicklas Lidstrom played more games as a Red Wing.

Marriage

Sergei claimed he and tennis star Anna Kournikova were married in 2001, but later divorced in 2003.[6] However, Kournikova's representatives deny any marriage to Fedorov.

Legal Trouble

Fedorov was arrested by Royal Oak, Michigan police in September 2001 for misdemeanor driving while impaired. Officers stopped Fedorov for running a red light and asked him to take a breathalyzer test. Fedorov registered a 0.09 blood alcohol level, which was below the 0.10 required for a drunk driving charge but Fedorov was charged with misdemeanor impaired driving. Fedorov pleaded guilty and was sentenced to a year's probation, directed to perform 100 hours of community service, and ordered to pay fines and court costs.

Awards & Achievements

Career statistics

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1986-87 CSKA Moscow USSR 29 6 6 12 12 -- -- -- -- --
1987-88 CSKA Moscow USSR 48 7 9 16 20 -- -- -- -- --
1988-89 CSKA Moscow USSR 44 9 8 17 35 -- -- -- -- --
1989-90 CSKA Moscow USSR 48 19 10 29 20 -- -- -- -- --
1990-91 Detroit Red Wings NHL 77 31 48 79 66 7 1 5 6 4
1991-92 Detroit Red Wings NHL 80 32 54 86 72 11 5 5 10 8
1992-93 Detroit Red Wings NHL 73 34 53 87 72 7 3 6 9 23
1993-94 Detroit Red Wings NHL 82 56 64 120 34 7 1 7 8 6
1994-95 Detroit Red Wings NHL 42 20 30 50 24 17 7 17 24 6
1995-96 Detroit Red Wings NHL 78 39 68 107 48 19 2 18 20 10
1996-97 Detroit Red Wings NHL 74 30 33 63 30 20 8 12 20 12
1997-98 Detroit Red Wings NHL 21 6 11 17 25 22 10 10 20 12
1998-99 Detroit Red Wings NHL 77 26 37 63 66 10 1 8 9 8
1999-00 Detroit Red Wings NHL 68 27 35 62 22 9 4 4 8 4
2000-01 Detroit Red Wings NHL 75 32 37 69 40 6 2 5 7 0
2001-02 Detroit Red Wings NHL 81 31 37 68 36 23 5 14 19 20
2002-03 Detroit Red Wings NHL 80 36 47 83 52 4 1 2 3 0
2003-04 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim NHL 80 31 34 65 42 -- -- -- -- --
2005-06 Mighty Ducks of Anaheim NHL 5 0 1 1 2 -- -- -- -- --
2005-06 Columbus Blue Jackets NHL 62 12 31 43 64 -- -- -- -- --
2006-07 Columbus Blue Jackets NHL 73 18 24 42 56 -- -- -- -- --
NHL totals 1128 461 644 1105 751 162 50 113 163 113

International play

Played for the Soviet Union in:

Played for Russia in:

Notes and References

  1. Fedorov may play defense rest of season. The Columbus Dispatch. Retrieved on 2007-03-16.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Wings of Legend: Sergei Fedorov. DetroitRedWings.com. Retrieved on 2007-01-26.
  3. Fedorov sparks Ducks while surpassing 1,000 points. USAToday.com (2004). Retrieved on 2007-01-26.
  4. Fedorov traded to Blue Jackets. CBC Sports (2005). Retrieved on 2007-01-26.
  5. Blue Jackets-Blues Preview. NHL.com (2005). Retrieved on 2007-01-26.
  6. Fedorov married, divorced Kournikova. CBC Sports (2003). Retrieved on 2007-01-26.

See also

External links

  • Sergei Fedorov's career stats at The Internet Hockey Database
  • Defenseman Announcement

This article uses material from the "Sergei Fedorov" article on the Ice Hockey wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.







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