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An Ice Hockey Wiki article.

Position Goaltender
Catches Left
Nickname(s) St. Patrick
Casseau
Height
Weight
6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
190 lb (86 kg)
Teams Montreal Canadiens
Colorado Avalanche
Nationality CAN
Born October 5 1965 (1965-10-05) (age 44),
Ste. Foy, QC, CAN
NHL Draft 51st overall, 1984
Montreal Canadiens
Pro Career 1985 – 2003
Hall of Fame, 2006

Patrick Jacques Roy (born October 5, 1965, in Ste. Foy, Quebec, Canada — a suburb of Quebec City) is a retired ice hockey goaltender. He is currently the co-owner, general manager, and head coach of the Québec Remparts of the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League. Nicknamed "St. Patrick," Roy split his professional career between the Montreal Canadiens and Colorado Avalanche, winning two Stanley Cups with each franchise. In 2004, Roy was selected as the greatest goaltender in NHL history by a panel of 41 writers, coupled with a simultaneous fan poll.[1] On November 13, 2006, Roy was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.[2]

Contents

Playing career

Montreal Canadiens

Roy began his NHL career with the Montreal Canadiens, who drafted him 51st overall in the 1984 NHL Entry Draft from the Granby Bisons. He played for the Habs from 1985 to 1995, leading them to the 1986 Stanley Cup in his rookie season. Roy became, at only 20, the youngest player in the NHL's history to win the Conn Smythe Trophy given to the playoffs most valuable player. He also was named to the 1986 NHL All-Rookie Team.

During his years with Montreal, Roy was the unquestionable superstar and leader of a team which did not have league leading scorers (past Canadiens dynasties were led by players such as Maurice Richard, Bernard Geoffrion, Jean Beliveau, and Guy Lafleur).

In the 1993 playoffs, after the Canadiens lost their first two games to their archrival Quebec Nordiques in the first round series, a newspaper in Roy's hometown district suggested that he be traded. Nordiques goaltending coach Dan Bouchard also proclaimed that his team had solved Roy. These comments seemed to fire up Roy, who responded by winning the next four games against the Nordiques, sweeping the Buffalo Sabres in the next round, and winning the first three against the New York Islanders to complete an eleven postseason game winning streak. Roy set a record during the postseason with 10 straight overtime wins, won the Stanley Cup, and was once again the Conn Smythe Trophy winner.

In 1994, the Canadiens were the defending champions but they were knocked out in the first round by the Boston Bruins. Nonetheless, that seven game series was notable in the eyes of Montreal fans as Roy came down with appendicitis and missed game three. He convinced doctors to let him return for Game Four and led the Canadiens to a 5-2 victory, stopping 39 shots[1].

The Tremblay Incident/Le Trade

On December 2, 1995 Montreal's head coach Mario Tremblay elected to keep Roy in the goal until he let in 9 goals on 26 shots during an 11-1 loss to the Detroit Red Wings[2]. This was the last straw for Roy in what was already a contentious relationship with the rookie head coach. Friction between the two dated back to Roy's rookie year, when Tremblay, then a Canadiens broadcaster, would needle the young Quebecer on his broken English and was critical of Roy through much of his career. The two had almost come to blows in a Long Island coffee shop before Tremblay was announced as a coach and his first appearance in the dressing room was greeted with snickers from Roy. They almost fought a second time after Tremblay fired a shot at Roy's throat during practice.

When Roy was replaced midway through the second period, as he was storming off the ice, Roy could be seen on-camera[3] telling Habs team President Ronald Corey that this was the last game he would ever play for Montreal, later elaborating by saying that he would not play for Montreal as long as Tremblay was coach. Three days after the incident, he was traded to Colorado along with Montreal captain Mike Keane in exchange for Jocelyn Thibault, Martin Rucinsky, and Andrei Kovalenko, which is known in Montreal as "Le Trade."[4] Roy's relationship with the Canadiens remained strained until the day the Canadiens retired his Jersey. On November 22nd 2008 the Canadiens raissed his #33 under the rafter of the Centre Bell, making him the 15th Player in Franchise History to receive this honor.

Since Le Trade, the Canadiens have won three playoff series (1998 vs. the Pittsburgh Penguins, and 2002 and 2004 vs. the Boston Bruins), and have won two games beyond the first round (during the 2002 Stanley Cup playoffs series against the Carolina Hurricanes). Montreal Gazette columnist Jack Todd, in a nod to other teams that have struggled since making odd personnel decisions, has written numerous times that the Canadiens are under "The Curse of St. Patrick." Indeed, the swap turned out to be, in hindsight, one of the most one-sided deals in NHL history. In 2004, ESPN called Roy's trade to Colorado a steal, and one of the worst moves ever made during the first 25 years of ESPN's existence.

Colorado Avalanche

The same season he was traded to the Avalanche, Roy helped lead them to their first Stanley Cup. He played for Colorado until his retirement in 2003, adding another Cup and capturing a record third Conn Smythe Trophy in 2001.

At the press conference to announce his retirement, Roy was asked by a reporter which NHL player he feared the most when playing. Roy replied that there was no one he feared when playing.

His final game was played against the Minnesota Wild on April 22, 2003, in a game seven overtime loss in the quarterfinals of the NHL playoffs.

Career accomplishments

In 1989, 1990, and 1992 Roy won the Vezina Trophy as the NHL's best goaltender. He won the Jennings Trophy (fewest goals allowed) in 1987, 1988, 1989 (all shared with Brian Hayward), 1992, and 2002. He led the league in shutouts and goals against average twice, was named a First Team All-Star four times, a Second Team All-Star twice, and played in eleven All-Star games. Roy has also won a record three Conn Smythe Trophies as NHL Playoff MVP (1986, 1993, and 2001).

Among the many goaltending NHL records Roy holds are career wins (551), career games played (1029), career playoff wins (151), and career playoff games played (247).

The Avalanche retired Roy's #33 jersey on 28 October 2003. While no Canadiens player has worn #33 since Roy's departure (as of 2006), the Canadiens have not retired the number, nor announced any intention to do so.

Patrick Roy was elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2006, in his first year of eligibility.

Quebec Remparts

After retiring from the NHL, Roy joined the Quebec Remparts of the QMJHL as vice president of hockey operations. He is also owner and general manager. On September 29, 2005, he was also named head coach of the team.

On May 28th, 2006, the Quebec Remparts won the Memorial Cup (top Canadian Hockey League tournament), beating the Moncton Wildcats 6-2 in the finals (although the Remparts were only the runner-up in the 2006 QMJHL championship, they were able to participate in the Memorial Cup since the QMJHL champions were the host city — see Memorial Cup, 1983 to present). Patrick Roy is the 7th coach to win the cup on his rookie year, and the first to do so since Claude Julien with the Hull Olympiques in 1997.

On January 19, 2007, Saguenay Police investigated an incident involving Roy and co-owner of the Chicoutimi Sagueneens, Pierre Cardinal. There were reports that Roy threw punches at the co-owner after he intervened in order to disperse a crowd of hockey fans that were blocking the Remparts bus after a game between the two clubs. A complaint for assault had been filed against Roy who may face assault charges in the matter. Montreal newspaper Le Journal de Montreal reported that Roy later apologized to the victim by telephone. [5][6].

In a press conference following a Remparts game on January 21, 2007, Roy said that he was "suffering prejudice on the part of the media" and believed that he was not feeling guilty of the incident. He then questioned his future as head coach and co-owner of the team, even considering resigning from his duties. [7]. On January 25, 2007, Cardinal announced that he removed his complaint against Roy, before Roy made a press conference about his future in the Quebec Remparts, where he announced he will stay coach and co-owner of the team. [8] [9]

Personal

  • Patrick Roy married Michèle Piuze on June 9, 1990. The couple divorced in early 2006. They have 3 children — Jonathan, Frederick, and Jana.
  • Since the 1980s, Roy has been a significant contributor to the Ronald McDonald House charity.
  • Roy was known for superstitious quirks. He never skated on the blue lines, often talked to the net posts, and he never talked to reporters on days of games he was playing later on.

Jeremy Roenick quote

In the 1996 Western Conference semi-finals between the Colorado Avalanche and the Chicago Blackhawks, Jeremy Roenick was stopped by Roy on a break-away during OT in game 4, while apparently being tackled by an Avalanche player. The referees did not call for a penalty shot on the play and the Avalanche won in triple overtime on Joe Sakic's game winning goal. Earlier in game 3, Roenick scored on an unchallenged breakaway to tie the score at 3 and send the game to overtime; the Blackhawks ended up winning the game.

After game 4, Roenick told the media "there should have been a penalty shot [on the play]. I like Patrick's comment when he said he could have stopped me [on the breakaway]. I'd like to know where Patrick was in Game 3, probably up trying to get his jock out of the rafters." Roy retorted with his now-famous line, "I can't hear what Jeremy says, because I've got my two Stanley Cup rings plugging my ears." [10]

Roy and the Avalanche beat the Blackhawks in 6 games and went on to win the Cup.

Awards

  • Stanley Cup - 1986, 1993, 1996, 2001
  • NHL All-Rookie Team - 1986
  • Played in 11 NHL All-Star Games - 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1997, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2003
  • NHL Second All-Star - 1988, 1991
  • NHL First All-Star Team - 1989, 1990, 1992, 2002
  • Conn Smythe Trophy - 1986, 1993, 2001
  • William M. Jennings Trophy - 1987*, 1988*, 1989*, 1992, 2002
  • Vezina Trophy - 1989, 1990, 1992
  • His jersey number 30 has been retired by the Granby Bisons.
  • His jersey number 33 has been retired by the Colorado Avalanche.
  • In 1998, he was ranked number 35 on The Hockey News' list of the 100 Greatest Hockey Players.
  • The Colorado Sports Hall Of Fame 2004
  • Hockey Hall of Fame inductee 2006
  • Was Ranked #5 in The Hockey News' The Top 60 Since 1967 - The Best Players of the Post Expansion Era

* Shared with Brian Hayward.

Records

  • Most NHL games played by a goaltender (1029)
  • Most NHL wins (551)
  • Most NHL playoff games played by a goaltender (247)
  • Most NHL playoff wins by a goaltender (151)
  • Most Conn Smythe Trophy wins (3)
  • Most minutes played in the Goaltender position in the NHL (75444)

Career statistics

Regular season

   
Season Team League GP W L T MIN GA SO GAA SV%
1982-83 Granby Bisons QMJHL 54 13 35 1 2808 293 0 6.26 -
1983-84 Granby Bisons QMJHL 69 29 29 1 3585 265 0 4.44 -
1984-85 Granby Bisons QMJHL 44 16 25 1 2463 228 0 5.55 -
1984-85 Sherbrooke Canadiens AHL 1 1 0 0 60 4 0 4.00 .852
1984-85 Montreal Canadiens NHL 1 1 0 0 20 0 0 0.00 1.000
1985-86 Montreal Canadiens NHL 47 23 18 3 2651 148 1 3.35 -
1986-87 Montreal Canadiens NHL 46 22 16 6 2686 131 1 2.93 .891
1987-88 Montreal Canadiens NHL 45 23 12 9 2586 125 3 2.90 .900
1988-89 Montreal Canadiens NHL 48 33 5 6 2744 113 4 2.47 .908
1989-90 Montreal Canadiens NHL 54 31 16 5 3173 134 3 2.53 .912
1990-91 Montreal Canadiens NHL 48 25 15 6 2835 128 1 2.71 .906
1991-92 Montreal Canadiens NHL 67 36 22 8 3935 155 5 2.36 .914
1992-93 Montreal Canadiens NHL 62 31 25 5 3595 192 3 3.20 .894
1993-94 Montreal Canadiens NHL 68 35 17 11 3867 161 7 2.50 .918
1994-95 Montreal Canadiens NHL 43 17 20 6 2566 127 1 2.97 .906
1995-96 Montreal Canadiens NHL 22 12 9 1 1260 62 1 2.95 .907
1995-96 Colorado Avalanche NHL 39 22 15 1 2305 103 1 2.68 .909
1996-97 Colorado Avalanche NHL 62 38 15 7 3698 143 7 2.32 .923
1997-98 Colorado Avalanche NHL 65 31 19 13 3835 153 4 2.39 .916
1998-99 Colorado Avalanche NHL 61 32 19 8 3648 139 5 2.29 .917
1999-00 Colorado Avalanche NHL 63 32 21 8 3704 141 2 2.28 .914
2000-01 Colorado Avalanche NHL 62 40 13 7 3585 132 4 2.21 .913
2001-02 Colorado Avalanche NHL 63 32 23 8 3773 122 9 1.94 .925
2002-03 Colorado Avalanche NHL 63 35 15 13 3769 137 5 2.18 .920
NHL Totals 1029 551 315 131 60235 2546 66 2.54 -

Playoffs

   
Season Team League GP W L MIN GA SO GAA
1983-84 Granby Bisons QMJHL 4 0 4 244 22 0 5.40
1984-85 Sherbrooke Canadiens AHL 13 10 3 769 37 0 2.88
1985-86 Montreal Canadiens NHL 20 15 5 1218 39 1 1.92
1986-87 Montreal Canadiens NHL 6 4 2 330 22 0 4.00
1987-88 Montreal Canadiens NHL 8 3 4 430 24 0 3.34
1988-89 Montreal Canadiens NHL 19 13 6 1206 42 2 2.08
1989-90 Montreal Canadiens NHL 11 5 6 641 26 1 2.43
1990-91 Montreal Canadiens NHL 13 7 5 785 40 0 3.05
1991-92 Montreal Canadiens NHL 11 4 7 686 30 1 2.62
1992-93 Montreal Canadiens NHL 20 16 4 686 30 1 2.62
1993-94 Montreal Canadiens NHL 6 3 3 375 16 0 2.56
1995-96 Colorado Avalanche NHL 22 16 6 1454 51 3 2.10
1996-97 Colorado Avalanche NHL 17 10 7 1034 38 3 2.20
1997-98 Colorado Avalanche NHL 7 3 4 430 18 0 2.51
1998-99 Colorado Avalanche NHL 19 11 8 1173 52 1 2.65
1999-00 Colorado Avalanche NHL 17 11 6 1039 30 3 1.79
2000-01 Colorado Avalanche NHL 23 16 7 1451 41 4 1.69
2001-02 Colorado Avalanche NHL 21 11 10 1241 52 3 2.51
2002-03 Colorado Avalanche NHL 7 3 4 423 16 1 2.26
NHL Totals 247 151 94 15209 584 23 2.30

International play

Played for Team Canada in:

International statistics

Year Team Comp   GP W L T MIN GA SO GAA
1998 Canada Oly 6 4 2 0 - - 1 1.46
Senior int'l totals 6 4 2 0 - - 1 1.46

Awards

Preceded by:
(1985)
Wayne Gretzky
Winner of the Conn Smythe Trophy
1986, 1993, 2001
Succeeded by:
(1987)
Ron Hextall
Preceded by:
(1992)
Mario Lemieux
Succeeded by:
(1994)
Brian Leetch
Preceded by:
(2000)
Scott Stevens
Succeeded by:
(2002)
Nicklas Lidström
Preceded by:
(1988)
Grant Fuhr
Winner of the Vezina Trophy
1989, 1990, 1992
Succeeded by:
(1991)
Ed Belfour
Preceded by:
(1991)
Ed Belfour
Succeeded by:
(1993)
Ed Belfour
Preceded by:
(1986)
Bob Froese
Darren Jensen
Winner of the William M. Jennings Trophy
1987-89, 1992, 2002
(1987-89 with Brian Hayward)
Succeeded by:
(1990)
Andy Moog
Rejean Lemelin
Preceded by:
(1991)
Ed Belfour
Succeeded by:
(1993)
Ed Belfour
Preceded by:
(2001)
Dominik Hasek
Succeeded by:
(2003)
Martin Brodeur
Roman Cechmanek
Robert Esche

References

  1. St. Patrick hailed as patron saint of stopping pucks. The Hockey News (November 22, 2004). Retrieved on April 11, 2007.
  2. Roy tops 2006 Hall of Fame class. CBC.ca/Sports Online (June 28, 2006). Retrieved on June 28, 2006.

External links

  • Patrick Roy's NHL player profile
  • Patrick Roy's career stats at The Internet Hockey Database

This article uses material from the "Patrick Roy" article on the Ice Hockey wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.







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