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Memory-beta

Up to date as of February 02, 2010

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EPISODE
Non Sequitur
Attribution
Series: Voyager
Written by: Brannon Braga
Directed by: David Livingston
Production information
Episode no.: 2x05
Production no.: 122
First aired: 25 September 1995
Chronology
Date: 49011.0 (2372)

Ensign Kim awakens to find himself on Earth, with his girlfriend Libby, and a good job at Starfleet. The young officer is far from pleased with this alternate reality, however, and sets out to return to his life aboard Voyager.

Contents

Summary

Characters

Regulars

Others

Referenced

Daniel Byrd

References

Starships

Locations

Species

States and Organisations

Information

Related Stories

Images

Reviews

Connections

published order
Previous episode:
Initiations
Voyager episode produced Next episode:
Parturition
Previous episode:
Elogium
Voyager episode aired Next episode:
Twisted
chronological order
Previous Adventure:
Wrath of the Prophets
Pocket Next Adventure:
The Way of the Warrior
Previous Adventure:
Initiations
The Voyages of the
USS Voyager
Next Adventure:
Ghost of a Chance

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This article uses material from the "Non Sequitur" article on the Memory-beta wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Halo

Up to date as of February 08, 2010

From Halopedia, the Halo Wiki

5.00
(1 vote)

Non sequitur (Latin for "it does not follow."), in formal logic, is an argument where its conclusion does not follow from its premises. In a non sequitur, the conclusion can be either true or false, but the argument is a fallacy because the conclusion does not follow from the premise. All formal fallacies are specific types of non sequitur. The term has special applicability in law, having a formal legal definition.

Here are two types of non sequitur of traditional noteworthiness:

  1. Any argument that takes the following form is a non sequitur:

If A is true, then B is true. B is stated to be true. Therefore, A must be true.

Even if the premises and conclusion are all true, the conclusion is not a necessary consequence of the premises. This sort of non sequitur is also called affirming the consequent.

  1. Another common non sequitur is this:

If A then B. Not A. Therefore, not B.

This sort of non sequitur is called denying the antecedent.

(If either of the above examples had "If and only if A, then B" as their first premise, then they would be valid and non-fallacious but unsound.)

Many other types of known non sequitur argument forms have been classified into many different types of logical fallacies. In everyday speech and reasoning, an example might be: "If my hair looks nice, all people will love me." However, there is no real connection between your hair and the love of all people. Advertising typically applies this kind of reasoning.

Trivia

Sources

  1. Halo: Ghosts of Onyx, pg. 133

This article uses material from the "Non Sequitur" article on the Halo wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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