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Muppet

Up to date as of February 02, 2010

From Muppet Wiki

Kermit as Indy in Disney World's Indiana Jones Stunt Spectacular.
Texas Telly and the Golden Triangle of Destiny.
Baby Kermit as Indiana Frog in the opening of Muppet Babies.
Adventure Kermit graces the cover of ToyFare.
Elmo dressed as Indy.

Indiana Jones is a fictional professor of archaeology, adventurer, and the main protagonist of the "Indiana Jones" franchise created by George Lucas and Steven Spielberg. The character appears in the 1981 adventure film Raiders of the Lost Ark, its prequels (Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom and The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles), and its sequels (Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade and Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull). Jones, famously played by Harrison Ford, is notable for his trademark bullwhip, fedora, leather jacket, and fear of snakes. In addition to his film and television incarnations, the character has been featured in novels, comics, video games, and other media.

Contents

References

  • Muppet Babies featured a number of appearances by Baby Kermit's alter ego, Indiana Frog.
    • The series opening credits featured Kermit swinging past the screen as Jones in front of live-action footage from Raiders of the Lost Ark.
    • The episode "Raiders of the Lost Muppet" draws heavily from the plot of The Temple of Doom and includes scenes from the film. Baby Piggy refers to Kermit here as her hero, Indiana Frog.
    • In "Good Clean Fun," Indiana Frog helps Baby Fozzie and Baby Piggy find Baby Animal in the sewer when they thought he got suck down the bathtub drain.
    • In "Once Upon an Egg Timer," Baby Kermit's 3 minute story is on Indiana Frog's Adventure to find the lost bark after Baby Rowlf lose his voice. The title of his story is also called, Raiders of the Lost Bark.
    • In "The House That Muppets Built," Baby Gonzo appears as Quasigonzo (a spoof of Quasimodo, a character also famous for swinging about by ropes) living in the bell towers of the Notre Dame cathedral. As he attempts to smother Baby Piggy with kisses, Indiana Frog swings in to save the damsel in distress.
    • As Baby Gonzo realizes that he'd rather stick around the calamity created by having several Muppet Babies appear as different characters in "Muppet Babies: The Next Generation," Indiana Frog swings in from off screen yodeling like Tarzan to once again save Baby Piggy.
  • Tug Monster dresses up as "Indiana Tug" (complete with Jones-style fedora) in the Little Muppet Monsters episode "The Great Boodini" as part of the monsters' explorer show.
  • To illustrate the arrival of special effects in movie making, a large spherical stone crashes through a wall in A Brief History of Motion Pictures. The music hints at the adventurous theme written for Indiana Jones by John Williams, and the prop is a direct reference to the opening action sequence of the first film.
  • Pepe the King Prawn provides his own impersonation of Indiana Jones in a gallery of special features included on Muppet Monster Adventure. He recites his version of the "why did it have to be snakes?" line from Raiders of the Lost Ark and chuckles at how clever his interpretation is. [1]
  • For the storytelling festival in the Bear in the Big Blue House episode "What's the Story?," Pip and Pop read from "The Adventures of Clamiana Jones."
  • Another episode of Sesame Street, Episode 2687, featured Jeff Goldblum as Bob's brother, Minneapolis. In contrast to Bob's established reserved personality, his brother is an Indiana Jones-type archaeologist on the hunt for the Golden Cabbage of Snuffertiti.
  • Elmo and Friends: Tales of Adventure is designed with an Indiana Jones theme. The front cover features an original illustration of archaeological ruins, the title is written in a font made to resemble that of the Indiana Jones franchise, the DVD menus include weathered maps similar to those seen in memorable transition scenes from the films and Elmo appears on the main menu wearing Indiana Jones' trademark brown pants and jacket, as well as a fedora. He's even animated swinging on a vine as the menu starts over.
  • In the Bert and Ernie's Great Adventures episode, "Wise Old Duck", Bert and Ernie pretend they are Indiana Jones-type explorers. They dress like Indiana Jones and run away from a giant egg in the vein of the giant boulder in Raiders of the Lost Ark.

Connections

  • Jim Broadbent played Dean Charles Stanforth in The Kingdom of the Crystal Skull
  • Corey Carrier played Henry "Indiana" Jones, Jr. in The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles
  • Anthony Daniels played Francois in The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode "The Attack of the Hawkmen"
  • Oliver Ford Davies played a ship captain in The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode "The Curse of the Jackal"
  • Alison Doody played Dr. Elsa Schneider in The Last Crusade
  • Robert Eddison played the Grail Knight in The Last Crusade
  • Peter Eyre played Kurt in The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode "Vienna, November 1908"
  • Jason Flemyng played Emile in The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episodes "Somme, Early August 1916" and "Germany, Mid-August 1916"
  • Neil Flynn played Smith in The Kingdom of the Crystal Skull
  • George Harris played Katanga in Raiders of the Lost Ark
  • Anne Heche played Kate in The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode "Young Indiana Jones and the Scandal of 1920"
  • William Hootkins played Major Eaton in Raiders of the Lost Ark and Sergei Pavlovich Diaghilev in The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode "Barcelona, May 1917"
  • John Hurt played Professor Oxley in The Kingdom of the Crystal Skull
  • Freddie Jones played Birdy in The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode "The Phantom Train of Doom"
  • Terry Jones played Marcello in The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode "Barcelona, May 1917"
  • Wolf Kahler played Dietrich in Raiders of the Lost Ark and a German second in The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode "Barcelona, May 1917"
  • Jane Krakowski played Dale Winter in The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode "Chicago, May 1920"
  • Jeroen Krabbe played Brockdorff in The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode "Paris, May 1919"
  • Phyllida Law played Signora Reale in The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode "Florence, May 1908"
  • Christopher Lee played Graf Czernin in The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode "Austria, March 1917"
  • George Lucas created and produced the entire Indiana Jones franchise
  • Bob Peck played General Targo (supposedly Vlad the Impaler) in The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode "Transylvania, January 1918"
  • Edward Petherbridge played Major Bilideau in The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode "Somme, Early August 1916"
  • Bryan Pringle played Zachariah Sloat in The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episodes "German East Africa, December 1916" and "Congo, January 1917"
  • Francesco Quinn played Francois in The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode "Young Indiana Jones and the Curse of the Jackal"
  • Vanessa Redgrave played Mrs. Prentiss in The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode "London, May 1916"
  • Ernie Reyes Jr. played a cemetary warrior in Kingdom of the Crystal Skull
  • Pat Roach played the mechanic and a sherpa in Raiders of the Lost Ark, the chief guard in The Temple of Doom, and a Gestapo soldier in The Last Crusade
  • Colin Skeaping performed stunts in The Temple of Doom
  • Steven Spielberg directed all four theatrical films
  • Allison Smith played Claire Lieberman in Young Indiana Jones and the Hollywood Follies
  • Drew Struzan created the posters for the film series and other franchise products
  • Edward Tudor-Pole played Medlicot in The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode "British East Africa, September 1909"
  • Jay Underwood played Ernest Hemingway in three episode of The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles
  • John Williams scored all four theatrical films
  • John Wood played Charles Leadbeater in The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles episode "Benares, January 1910"

Gallery

External links

Visit the:
Wikipedia has an article related to:
  • IndianaJones.com, official website
  • YoungIndy.com, official website
  • TheRaider.net, fansite

This article uses material from the "Indiana Jones" article on the Muppet wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Marvel Database

Up to date as of February 09, 2010

From Marvel Database

This page contains a list of all the comics included in this volume of the series.
If you have found something that is not seen on this page, please add it to this list.
(This template will categorize articles that include it into Category:Comic Lists.)
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This article uses material from the "Comics:The Further Adventures Of Indiana Jones Vol 1" article on the Marvel Database wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Starwars

Up to date as of February 04, 2010

From Wookieepedia, the Star Wars wiki.

File:Atticon.png

This article is non-canon.

This article covers a subject that has been deemed non-canon by either the author or the Star Wars licensees, and thus should not be taken as a part of the "real" Star Wars universe.

Indiana Jones
Biographical information
Homeworld

Unknown planet

Physical description
Species

Human

Gender

Male

Hair color

Brown

Doctor Indiana Jones was an archaeologist on an unknown planet in approximately 120-130 ABY.

Contents

Biography

Jones's native homeworld was a planet with many oceans and forests. The planet was very primitive compared to most of the galaxy, even being surprised at the common sight of a starship.[1] Sometime later, he met Shorty, a young boy. He also visited a region on his planet known as Atlantis, along with other discoveries.[1]

One of his discoveries was the habitat of Chewbacca (whom the local Human natives preferred to call "Sasquatch") and the crashed Millennium Falcon, which, as he admitted, was unlike anything he had seen before, even in Atlantis. Jones and his assistant, Shorty, started to explore the ship's wreckage, but decided to leave it alone after encountering strangely disturbing remains of Han Solo within.[1]

One day, while exploring ruins in a place called Mexico, Indiana Jones discovered an alien who abducted him to took him back to his home planet of Xantar.[2] While on the planet he was discovered by Luke Skywalker.[3]

He carried a whip and a pistol as weapons,[4] and bore a strong resemblance to Rebel Alliance hero Han Solo, which both he himself and fellow hero Luke Skywalker noticed.[1][5] He wore the same clothes wherever he went, including a brown fedora.[4][1][5]

Behind the scenes

Indiana Jones meets Luke Skywalker in Star Wars: Yoda Stories.

Dr. Henry Walton Jones Jr., better known as "Indiana Jones" or "Indy" for short, was created by George Lucas for Raiders of the Lost Ark, and famously played by Harrison Ford (ages 36-58). A total of four films have been made, which were co-written and produced by George Lucas and directed by Steven Spielberg. The character was also played by Corey Carrier (ages 9/10), Sean Patrick Flanery (ages 16-21), and George Hall (ages 93/94) in George Lucas' The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles television series.

In addition to being the inspiration for Chewbacca, George Lucas' late dog Indiana was the inspiration for the Indiana Jones character. Also, Lucas' middle name is "Walton", which is revealed to be Indiana's middle name in The Adventures of Young Indiana Jones. For a list of Star Wars references in Indiana Jones, see List of references to Star Wars in movies.

Many cast and crew members, as well as authors have been involved in both the Star Wars and Indiana Jones franchises:

  • Carrie Fisher wrote the episode "Paris, October 1916" of The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles.
  • Author James Luceno, who has written many Star Wars books, wrote the Indiana Jones novel The Mata Hari Affair and reference book Indiana Jones: The Ultimate Guide.
  • Frank Darabont wrote multiple episodes of The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles. Because of this, he was originally asked by Rick McCallum to write the screenplay for Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace (Lucas ultimately decided to write it himself). He later wrote a rejected screenplay for Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull.
  • Jonathan Hales wrote multiple episodes of The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles, and went on to serve as co-writer on Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones.
  • The Star Wars Insider has had on-and-off coverage of the Indiana Jones franchise. Indiana Jones is the subject of the recurring Indy Vault series in Star Wars Insider. The column is written by J. W. Rinzler, who wrote The Making of Star Wars: The Definitive Story Behind the Original Film and The Making of Indiana Jones: The Definitive Story Behind All Four Films. Indiana Jones now has his own magazine, Indiana Jones: The Official Magazine.
  • Julian Glover starred alongside Harrison Ford in Indiana Jones and The Last Crusade as the main villain, Walter Donovan.

LEGO Star Wars II: The Original Trilogy features Indiana Jones's signature hat in the level where Han Solo and Chewbacca go to meet Luke Skywalker, Obi-Wan Kenobi, R2-D2 and C-3PO at the Millennium Falcon docking bay in Mos Eisley. Also featured is a baseball cap, a tall hat and a witch's hat.

LEGO Star Wars: The Complete Saga features a playable cameo by Dr. Jones, most likely due to the recently released LEGO Indiana Jones: The Original Adventures, and the ease of porting character files between the compatible games. The game features himself using a whip or a pistol. Also, like many other characters, he can jump, roll, and fire three shots rapidly. Previews of Lego Indiana Jones show him with stubble on his face. However, his face here is the same as Han Solo (whose basic animations he shares).

In The Paradise Snare, Han Solo has many aliases given by Garris Shrike. One of them is "Jenos Idanian," an anagram of "Indiana Jones."

Jones makes an appearance in Star Wars: Yoda Stories (as a continuation to events seen in Indiana Jones' Desktop Adventures), where Luke Skywalker comments on his similarity to Han Solo.

In the 2009 game "Indiana Jones and the Staff of Kings", Han Solo is one of the unlockable skins for the Wii version.

Appearances

  • LEGO Star Wars: The Complete Saga
  • LEGO Star Wars: The Quest for R2-D2
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars: Republic Heroes (Mentioned only)
  • Star Wars: Yoda Stories (First appearance)
  • Into the Great Unknown

Sources

  • Star Wars: The Roleplaying Game, First Edition (First mentioned)

Notes and references

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Into the Great Unknown
  2. Indiana Jones and his Desktop Adventures
  3. Yoda Stories
  4. 4.0 4.1 LEGO Star Wars: The Complete Saga
  5. 5.0 5.1 Star Wars: Yoda Stories

See also

External links


This article uses material from the "Indiana Jones" article on the Starwars wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.







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