The Full Wiki

Humanoid: Misc

Advertisements
  
  

Dr Who

Up to date as of January 31, 2010

From TARDIS Index File, the free Doctor Who reference.

Humanoids are generally bilaterally symmetrical bipeds with a naturally upright posture, two arms, two legs, one thorax, a neck and head with a brain located in it. The most recognizable features are their facial features. They usually look similar to Humans, with the best example being the Gallifreyans.

The humanoid form makes an excellent concentrated protein. (DW: Revelation of the Daleks)

The Daleks used humanoids as work machines, believing they had no other value. (DW: Destiny of the Daleks)

However, this was most likely due to their Dalek-centric view than to any other reason.

Humanoids are referred as "fleshy bipeds" by the Mantasphid Queen. (DW: The Infinite Quest)

Theories

One of the more popular theories as to the many humanoid species is that the evolution of Gallifreyans relatively early in the history of the universe affected a morphic field for the humanoid form that resonated across the universe and influenced the development of later species in a similar direction. (NA: Lucifer Rising)

Another implies that Rassilon seeded the early planets with biogenic molecules that would develop into humanoids, specifically ones which resembled Gallifreyans. (BFA: Zagreus)


This article uses material from the "Humanoid" article on the Dr Who wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Memory-beta

Up to date as of February 02, 2010

Memory Beta, the wiki for licensed Star Trek content.

The term humanoid refers to any being whose body structure resembles that of a human. In this sense, the term describes sentient bipedal lifeforms in possession of two arms, two legs, hands, feet, one thorax, a neck, and a head. They are generally mammalian but the term is not exclusive to that biological classification.

The majority of the galaxy's intelligent species are humanoid which is no coincidence as all originate from an earlier progenitor species which seeded many worlds with DNA codes which would lead to the evolution of lifeforms similar to themselves. These ancient progenitors, whom it is thought might be precursors of the Preservers left evidence of their existence in the form of DNA sequences on various planets which when assembled formed a computer program to communicate with their decedents. The first known playing of this message was in 2369 when members of several humanoid species worked together to complete it. (TNG episode: "The Chase"; ST roleplay module: All Our Yesterdays: The Time Travel Sourcebook)


This article uses material from the "Humanoid" article on the Memory-beta wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

DC Comics

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From DC Database

A humanoid is a bilaterallly symmetrical biped with a naturally upright posture, two arms, two legs, hands, feet, one thorax, a neck and a head with a brain located in it.

Some humanoids are outwardly indistinguishable from humans, right down to such morphological minutiae as the same ethnological phenotypes, hair patterns, fingernails and cartilaginous foldings of the nose and ears (e.g. Kryptonians, Rannians, Daxamites, Thanagarians, Almeracians). The reason for this staggering similarity in anatomical characteristics among races evolving on countless worlds separated by thousands of light years is the result of patterns of space-time known as "morphogenetic fields".

Morphogenetic fields are non-physical blueprints that give birth to forms. A morphogenetic field, is an equivalent to an electromagnetic field that carries information only, not energy, and are available throughout time and space without any loss of intensity after they have been created.

Morphogenetic fields are created by the patterns of physical forms. They help guide the formation of later similar systems where a newly forming system "tunes into" a previous system by having within it a "seed" that resonates with a similar seed in the earlier form. Thus, the DNA in the genes of a living system does not carry all the information needed to shape that system, but it can act as a "tuning seed" that tunes in the morphogenetic fields of previous systems of the same type.

The first sentient life to form in this universe was a humanoid species, and since morphogenetic fields are reinforced by every successive generation, they established the morphogenetic field for all humanoid species throughout this universe, insuring they would evolve on other planets via parallel evolution.

The "human form" is the same physical archetype of the first humanoids and therefore represents the basic way that evolution most likely takes for the dominant sentient mammalian species on certain types of planets under the influence of the morphogenetic field and the other humanoid races evolved under very specific and usually unique environmental conditions that would have been inhospitable to the human form.

This page needs to be templated.

This article is currently formatted using an older, obsolete template. Editors are encouraged to reformat this page using the appropriate template provided on the templates page. Select from (Comic, Character, Team, Location, Item or Organization)
(This template will categorize articles that include it into Category:Template Required)

Advertisements

This article uses material from the "Humanoid" article on the DC Comics wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Final Fantasy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Final Fantasy Wiki

Humanoid may refer to:


This article uses material from the "Humanoid" article on the Final Fantasy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Marvel Database

Up to date as of February 09, 2010
(Redirected to Glossary:Humanoid article)

From Marvel Database

Humanoid

Having virtually the same physical characteristics as a human being. Only a normal Earth human being can properly be termed human, although mutants, Eternals, and Inhumans can be classified as human under a broader definition of the term. Beings who greatly resemble human beings in physical characteristics, but are not exactly like them are humanoids. Beings who resemble humans in some major outward physical characteristics but not in others that are of equal importance are called semi-humanoids.

[top] [Edit Humanoid]


This article uses material from the "Glossary:Humanoid" article on the Marvel Database wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

ST Expanded

Up to date as of February 07, 2010

The Star Trek Expanded Universe Database is for fanon and related content. See Memory-Alpha.org for the canon Star Trek wiki.

  1. REDIRECTmemoryalpha:Humanoid

This article uses material from the "Humanoid" article on the ST Expanded wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Starwars

Up to date as of February 04, 2010

From Wookieepedia, the Star Wars wiki.

A Duros, an example of a humanoid.
"If you're not a humanoid, she's not much to look at. But grav-ball's never been more popular and Deme Tryshyn is the real deal. It doesn't matter if a kid has one limb or seven, they probably have Tryshyn's picture projecting on their sleeping quarters wall."
Mij Rawd

A humanoid species (also sometimes called anthropoid) was one that was similar in overall form to Humans, the most common sentient species in the galaxy. The term is less specific than Near-Human, which generally implies common biological ancestry with Humans.

Classification of a species as "humanoid" was not standardized or strict. Generally, a humanoid species had to have a similar anatomy to Humans at least in some degrees: that is, an upright bipedal stance, a head with two eyes, nose for breathing and smelling and mouth for nutrition and communication. Symmetrically arranged on either side of the torso (which is the main section of the body) were two arms -- each of which ended in hands that had a variable number of fingers (used for manipulation of objects) -- and two legs -- which ended in feet (used for locomotion). Humanoids generally had sparse hair, mainly concentrated on the head or face.

Slight variations and deviations from this general 'template' could be overlooked and a species could still be classified as humanoid. For example Duros had no ears, nose, or hair; Twi'leks and Togruta featured headtails; and many non-Humanoids had Humanoid features. Wookiees, although seeming animalic, could be called humanoids.

The term humanoid should not be confused with Near-Human, which is the term used to describe species and races that were closely related, biologically, to baseline Humans.

Non-humanoid sentient species had distinctly nonhuman characteristics, such as tails, additional limbs (or even no limbs, as with the Slith), wings, additional heads (as the Cha'wen'hes), or invertebrate characteristics (as the Gree).

Contents

Examples of humanoid aliens

Ki-Adi-Mundi, a Cerean.

Examples of non-humanoid aliens

Xexto, an example of a nonhumanoid species.

Examples of semi-humanoids

These species, though they shared some anatomical similarities to Humans, had other characteristics which made their appearance mostly inHuman.

Sources

External links


This article uses material from the "Humanoid" article on the Starwars wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message