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Dr Who

Up to date as of January 31, 2010

From TARDIS Index File, the free Doctor Who reference.

Holograms are three-dimensional light images used for information storage and communication.

Races and individuals with access to holographic technology include:

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has a more detailed and comprehensive article on

This article uses material from the "Hologram" article on the Dr Who wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Memory-beta

Up to date as of February 02, 2010

Memory Beta, the wiki for licensed Star Trek content.

A hologram is a three-dimensional construction that consists of photons, forcefields, and matter that is generated by holo-emitters or similar devices. Simple holograms can be of inanimate objects; more advanced holoprograms can create animated simulacrums of living beings that can interact with real people, and behave as sentient beings.

Contents

Applications and uses

Basic hologram applications

Recreational applications

Communications applications

Tactical applications

Medical applications

The most widespread use of holographic technology in 24th century medicine was the Emergency Medical Hologram, or EMH.

Holographic technology has also been used as a stopgap measure to replace patients' damaged or missing internal organs. This method was first used by the EMH Mark I aboard the USS Voyager in 2371, when passenger Neelix had his lungs removed by Vidiians. (VOY episode: "Phage") Dr. Elizabeth Lense used this same method in 2377, after Crewman Bart Faulwell had his kidney, pancreas and spleen damaged by a projectile. (CoE eBook: Signs from Heaven)

Other technologies


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This article uses material from the "Hologram" article on the Memory-beta wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Fallout

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From The Vault

A hologram is a projected three-dimensional representation of a person or object. It is a highly advanced, experimental technology that was never widely used before the Great War.

Known holograms

The following is based on Fallout 2 cut content and has not been confirmed by canon sources.
The following is based on Fallout: Brotherhood of Steel and has not been confirmed by canon sources.
The following is based on Van Buren and has not been confirmed by canon sources.

See also

Gallery


This article uses material from the "Hologram" article on the Fallout wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Halo

Up to date as of February 08, 2010
(Redirected to Holography article)

From Halopedia, the Halo Wiki

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Holography is a technological system employed by the UNSC, the Covenant and the Forerunners in a variety of functions - communications, battle and sensor displays, and as decoys. Devices used to project holograms are commonly referred to as Holotanks.

Contents

Overview

Holography was invented in 1947 by Hungarian physicist Dennis Gabor (1900–1979), work for which he received the Nobel Prize in physics in 1971. It was made possible by pioneering work in the field of physics by other scientists like Mieczysław Wolfke who resolved technical issues that previously made advancements impossible. The discovery was an unexpected result of research into improving electron microscopes at the British Thomson-Houston Company in Rugby, England. The British Thomson-Houston company filed a patent on 1947-12-17 (and received patent GB685286), but the field did not really advance until the development of the laser in 1960.

The first holograms that recorded 3D objects were made by Yuri Denisyuk in the Soviet Union in 1962; later by Emmett Leith and Juris Upatnieks in University of Michigan, USA in 1962. Advances in photochemical processing techniques, to produce high-quality display holograms were achieved by Nicholas J. Phillips.

Several types of holograms can be made. Transmission holograms, such as those produced by Leith and Upatnieks, are viewed by shining laser light through them and looking at the reconstructed image from the side of the hologram opposite the source. A later refinement, the "rainbow transmission" hologram allows more convenient illumination by white light rather than by lasers or other monochromatic sources. Rainbow holograms are commonly seen today on credit cards as a security feature and on product packaging. These versions of the rainbow transmission hologram are commonly formed as surface relief patterns in a plastic film, and they incorporate a reflective aluminum coating which provides the light from "behind" to reconstruct their imagery.

Another kind of common hologram, the reflection or Denisyuk hologram, is capable of multicolor image reproduction using a white light illumination source on the same side of the hologram as the viewer.

What is generally, and incorrectly, referred to as a hologram in most science fiction, including the Halo series, is actually a Volumetric Display. true holograms are not three-dimensional images. More specifically, Halo "holograms" seem to be of the Static Volume type, creating an actual three-dimensional image rather than creating the illusion of it.[1]

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UNSC

A holographic topographical map and AI Avatar, aboard a UNSC warship, the Spirit of Fire.

The UNSC uses holographic technology in a variety of ways. Artificial Intelligences, such as Cortana, project holographic representations of themselves for personal communications with humans, with each AI taking a unique appearance of their own choice. The UNSC also uses holograms for communications between individual humans. The commanding officer of one ship may "appear" on another to deliver a message when normally access between the two vessels is restricted. Also, holographic technology is used by the UNSC to project topographical maps for tactical purposes. Many UNSC warships, such as the UNSC Spirit of Fire and the UNSC Say My Name had holographic tables. Humans also use holographic technology to display holographic "photographs", referred to as Holo-Stills. Holographic tape known as "Holo-Tape" is used to display information on the sides of civilian vehicles.[2]

Covenant

Covenant Prophets use holographic projectors to preach to their troops.

The Covenant's holographic technology is also based primarily on that of the Forerunners, and though superior to UNSC technology it still pales in comparison. Covenant often utilize stationary Holotanks much like the UNSC, but also portable projectors referred to as Holo-Pedestals. The Covenant use holograms for visual displays of space and ground combat, allowing a better general view of the action and better coordination.[3] Holograms are also used as decoys, through devices known as Holo-Drones, able to generate their own shields and weapons to give the illusion of reality. One of these was used by the Heretic Leader before his death at the hands of the Arbiter.[4] The Prophets, in particular, make extensive use of holography in their governance of the Covenant. Religious sermons, such as those by the Prophet of Truth[5] and Prophet of Regret[6], are transmitted holographically, allowing the Prophets to preach from the relative safety of their point of transmission while protected by armed guards.

Forerunners

An enigmatic Forerunner hologram on Epitaph.

Though now extinct, the Forerunners were true masters of holography. Their projections were accurate far beyond UNSC or even Covenant capabilities, able to appear as solid and actual objects. Holograms were used on Alpha Halo for a visible representation of the ringworld, and on the Ark for each of the Halo's and for a visual demonstration by 343 Guilty Spark on the Halo Array's capabilities. It is also notable to mention that many of the Forerunner terminals and nodes that can be activated, particularly in Halo 3, as holograms, yet apparently feel solid and can be pressed by the Master Chief. This could just be him passing his hand over the hologram, but in-game he appears to actually touch them. If this is so, then the Forerunner were also capable of producing "Hard Light" a type material made of photons so compact that they form a solid object. Either way, they are truly magnificent feats of engineering.

The Forerunner ruins underneath CASTLE Base, despite aeons of neglect, were still capable of projecting a myriad of environments from hundreds of worlds, likely a representation of former Forerunner colonies.

Gallery

Sources

  1. Wikipedia's article on Holography
  2. Halo: Contact Harvest, Chapter 5, page 77
  3. In the background on the Shadow of Intent
  4. Halo 2, The Heretic (Level)
  5. Halo 3, Tsavo Highway (Level), The Storm (Level), The Ark (Level) and The Covenant (Level)
  6. Halo 2, Delta Halo (Level) and Regret (Level)

This article uses material from the "Holography" article on the Halo wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

ST Expanded

Up to date as of February 07, 2010

The Star Trek Expanded Universe Database is for fanon and related content. See Memory-Alpha.org for the canon Star Trek wiki.

  1. REDIRECTmemoryalpha:Hologram

This article uses material from the "Hologram" article on the ST Expanded wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Starwars

Up to date as of February 04, 2010

From Wookieepedia, the Star Wars wiki.

Hologram
Production information
Type

Projector

Usage and history
Era(s)
Affiliation

Various

"Help me, Obi-Wan Kenobi, you're my only hope *static* Help me, Obi-Wan Kenobi, you're my only hope."
Leia Organa's message to Obi-Wan Kenobi

A hologram was a projected three-dimensional representation of a person or object, normally used in communication or entertainment.

Contents

Operation

Agen Kolar's hologram indicates his remote participation in a Jedi Council meeting.

Holograms were used mostly in telecommunications as an alternative to screens. A holocamera of any recorder or receiver would acquire the dimensions, form and movements of an object by means of ray scanning. This vision then could be transmitted simultaneously somewhere else, or stored and reproduced on a holoprojector at a later time. Projected holographic images were visible from all sides, although matterless. Holograms were initially monochrome with a cyan hue, though following the Clone Wars, an additional layer of color was added to some holograms. In full duplex telecommunications, users could see each other's holograms, as if they were in the same room talking to each other, although not always in relative proportion.

Standard holograms had a lesser quality than screens, since they were mainly monochrome and often flickered. The luxury versions could produce incredibly life-like full-color images, and were mainly used for entertainment purposes, such as at the Holographic Zoo of Extinct Animals, or Hologram Fun World, though they could also be used for disguises and other deceptions.

Uses

Obi-Wan Kenobi watching a hologram of Darth Vader kneeling before Darth Sidious
"I can't watch any more."
Obi-Wan Kenobi upon seeing a hologram of Darth Vader slaughtering Jedi

Portable holovids could display a miniature hologram. Projectors were also implemented in many starship communication systems, both for use by pilots and passengers. Some droids could also record and display holograms (eg. R2-D2).

Members of the Jedi Council could attend Council meetings via hologram if absent from Coruscant or otherwise unable to be there physically. Their image would project on their formal seat and they would participate as if they were present.

Briefing hologram of Endor and the Death Star II before the Battle of Endor

Holograms were also frequently used in scientific projects as schematics. Likewise, they could be used in military operations and briefings. During the Battle of Naboo, R2-D2 projected a hologram of the Theed Royal Palace before organizing the assault. Prior to the Battle of Endor, a hologram of Death Star II illustrated the attack plan to the Rebellion pilots.

Holograms were also used in targeting practice. For instance, the Republic clone army used holograms of B1 battle droids and B2 super battle droids, as well as holograms of Anakin Skywalker and Obi-Wan Kenobi, to train their clone sharpshooters and improve their ability to distinguish between hostile and friendly targets.[1]

Someone who forged holograms and passed them off as the real thing was known as a holo faker.[2]

Storage of holograms

Jan Ors, Mon Mothma, Luke Skywalker, and Leia Organa view a cracked hologram of Morgan Katarn.

Holograms could be transmitted directly, or they could be stored in various storage devices (such as holodiscs)[3][4] and in astromech units or other types of droids. The storage device would be hooked up with a holoprojector in order for the stored image to be accessed. Many droids had built-in holoprojectors.

Hologram storage devices could be encrypted in case their contents were deemed sensitive or classified. Morgan Katarn recorded and encrypted a hologram for his son revealing his Jedi heritage. The hologram was stored on a holodisc and could only be accessed by the Katarn family droid WeeGee. However, Jan Ors and Xiong Wong (with the help of Wires) managed to partially crack the hologram and display it, albeit in a very bad quality, to Mon Mothma, Leia Organa and Luke Skywalker.[4]

Notable entertainment holos

Appearances

This list is incomplete. You can help Wookieepedia by expanding it.
  • Tales of the Jedi: The Golden Age of the Sith
  • Star Wars Knights of the Old Republic: Commencement
  • Star Wars Knights of the Old Republic: Flashpoint
  • Star Wars Knights of the Old Republic 9: Flashpoint Interlude: Homecoming
  • Star Wars Knights of the Old Republic: Reunion
  • Star Wars Knights of the Old Republic: Days of Fear
  • Star Wars Knights of the Old Republic: Nights of Anger
  • Star Wars Knights of the Old Republic 39: Dueling Ambitions, Part 1
  • Star Wars Knights of the Old Republic 40: Dueling Ambitions, Part 2
  • Star Wars Knights of the Old Republic 45: Destroyer, Part 1
  • Star Wars Knights of the Old Republic 48: Demon, Part 2
  • Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic
  • Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic II: The Sith Lords
  • Darth Bane: Path of Destruction
  • Jedi Apprentice: The Dark Rival
  • Jedi Apprentice Special Edition: The Followers
  • Star Wars: The Rise and Fall of Darth Vader
  • Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan: Last Stand on Ord Mantell
  • Jedi Council: Acts of War
  • Cloak of Deception
  • Star Wars: Darth Maul
  • Darth Maul: Shadow Hunter
  • Star Wars: Starfighter
  • Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace novel
  • Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace
  • Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace comic
  • Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace junior novel
  • Star Wars Republic: Outlander
  • Nomad
  • Star Wars Republic: Twilight
  • Star Wars Republic: The Stark Hyperspace War (Appears in flashback(s))
  • Rogue Planet
  • Jedi Quest: The Way of the Apprentice
  • Jedi Quest: The Trail of the Jedi
  • Outbound Flight
  • Star Wars: Jango Fett
  • Star Wars: Zam Wesell
  • Jedi Quest: The Dangerous Games
  • Jedi Quest: The Master of Disguise
  • Jedi Quest: The School of Fear
  • Star Wars Republic: Honor and Duty
  • The Approaching Storm
  • Star Wars: Jedi Starfighter
  • Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones
  • Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones junior novel
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars: Sharpshooter
  • "Death in the Catacombs" - Star Wars Insider 79
  • Star Wars Republic 50: The Defense of Kamino
  • Star Wars Republic: The New Face of War
  • Star Wars: Republic Commando
  • Star Wars Republic 53: Blast Radius
  • Omega Squad: Targets
  • Jedi: Shaak Ti
  •  "Fierce Currents" - Clone Wars Adventures: Volume 1
  •  "Hide in Plain Sight" - Clone Wars Adventures: Volume 2
  •  "Old Scores" - Clone Wars Adventures: Volume 8
  •  "One of a Kind" - Clone Wars Adventures: Volume 8
  • Star Wars Republic 54: Double Blind
  • Jedi: Aayla Secura
  • Jedi: Count Dooku
  • Star Wars Republic: The Battle of Jabiim
  • Jedi: Yoda
  • Star Wars Republic 64: Bloodlines (Appears in flashback(s))
  • The Clone Wars: Shadowed
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars – "The Hidden Enemy"
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars film / novel
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars: Lightsaber Duels
  • Star Wars The Clone Wars 5: Slaves of the Republic - Chapter 5: A Slave now, a Slave forever
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars – "Rookies"
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars – "Defenders of Peace"
  • The Clone Wars: The Valley
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars – "Blue Shadow Virus"
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars – "Mystery of a Thousand Moons"
  • The Clone Wars: Covetous
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars – "Innocents of Ryloth"
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars – "Liberty on Ryloth"
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars: Republic Heroes
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars – "Hostage Crisis"
  • Star Wars The Clone Wars 7: In Service of the Republic, Part 1
  • Star Wars The Clone Wars 8: In Service of the Republic, Part 2
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars – "Holocron Heist"
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars – "Cargo of Doom"
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars – "Children of the Force"
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars – "Senate Spy"
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars – "Landing at Point Rain"
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars – "Weapons Factory"
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars – "Legacy of Terror"
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars – "Grievous Intrigue"
  • Star Wars: The Clone Wars – "The Mandalore Plot"
  • Star Wars The Clone Wars: Hero of the Confederacy
  • Star Wars The Clone Wars Volume 4: The Colossus of Destiny
  • Star Wars Republic: Show of Force
  • MedStar II: Jedi Healer
  • Star Wars Republic 68: Armor
  • Star Wars: General Grievous
  • Secrets of the Jedi
  • Jedi Trial
  • Yoda: Dark Rendezvous
  • Star Wars Republic: The Dreadnaughts of Rendili
  • Star Wars Republic: Trackdown
  • Star Wars: Obsession
  • Star Wars: Clone Wars
  • Heroes on Both Sides
  •  "Chain of Command" - Clone Wars Adventures: Volume 10
  • Labyrinth of Evil
  • Evasive Action: Reversal of Fortune
  • Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith
  • Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith comic
  • Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith junior novel
  • Star Wars Republic: The Hidden Enemy
  • Dark Lord: The Rise of Darth Vader
  • Star Wars Purge: Seconds to Die
  • Coruscant Nights I: Jedi Twilight
  • Coruscant Nights III: Patterns of Force
  • The Order of Outcasts
  • The Last of the Jedi: Death on Naboo
  • The Last of the Jedi: A Tangled Web
  • The Last of the Jedi: Return of the Dark Side
  • The Last of the Jedi: Secret Weapon
  • The Last of the Jedi: Against the Empire
  • The Last of the Jedi: Master of Deception
  • Star Wars: Droids
  • Outbid But Never Outgunned
  • Star Wars: The Force Unleashed video game
  • Star Wars: The Force Unleashed comic (Appears in flashback(s))
  • Boba Fett: Enemy of the Empire
  • Star Wars: Empire at War
  • Star Wars Empire: Betrayal
  • Luke's Fate
  • Star Wars Empire: Darklighter
  • X-wing Rogue Squadron ½
  • Star Wars Empire: The Short, Happy Life of Roons Sewell
  • Star Wars Journal: The Fight for Justice
  • Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope novel (First appearance)
  • Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope
  • Perfect Evil
  • LEGO Star Wars II: The Original Trilogy (Non-canonical appearance)
  • Star Wars 1
  • R2-D2's Mission: A Little Hero's Journey
  • Rookies: No Turning Back
  • Darth Vader Strikes
  • Vader's Quest
  • The Star Wars Holiday Special
  • Galaxy of Fear: Army of Terror
  • Star Wars Galaxies: An Empire Divided
  • Star Wars: Force Commander
  • Star Wars Empire: "General" Skywalker (Vision)
  • Star Wars Empire 28: Wreckage
  • Star Wars Empire: In the Shadows of Their Fathers (Appears in flashback(s))
  • Star Wars Empire: The Wrong Side of the War
  • Boba Fett: Overkill
  • Star Wars Rebellion 0: Crossroads
  • Star Wars Rebellion: My Brother, My Enemy
  • Star Wars Rebellion: The Ahakista Gambit
  • River of Chaos
  • "Combat Moon" - Star Wars Adventure Journal 9
  • Star Wars Adventures Volume 2: Princess Leia and the Royal Ransom
  • Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back
  • Shadows of the Empire comic
  •  "The Evacuation of Jatee" - Supernova (WEG)
  • Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi
  • Shadows of the Empire: Evolution
  • Star Wars: Jedi Knight: Dark Forces II
  • Dark Forces: Rebel Agent
  • Boba Fett: Twin Engines of Destruction
  • "Kella Rand, Reporting..." - Star Wars Adventure Journal 6
  • X-wing: Rogue Squadron
  • X-wing: Wedge's Gamble
  • X-wing: The Krytos Trap
  • X-wing: Wraith Squadron
  • X-wing: Iron Fist
  • The Courtship of Princess Leia
  • Tatooine Ghost
  • Heir to the Empire
  • Boba Fett: Agent of Doom
  • Darksaber
  • X-wing: Starfighters of Adumar
  • Specter of the Past
  • Junior Jedi Knights: Anakin's Quest
  • Junior Jedi Knights: Vader's Fortress
  • Junior Jedi Knights: Kenobi's Blade
  • Star Wars Invasion 3: Refugees, Part 3
  • Edge of Victory II: Rebirth
  • Star by Star
  • The Final Prophecy
  • Dark Nest I: The Joiner King
  • Dark Nest II: The Unseen Queen
  • Dark Nest III: The Swarm War
  • Star Wars Legacy 8: Allies
  • Star Wars Legacy: Broken
  • Star Wars Legacy 4: Noob
  • Star Wars Legacy: Storms

Sources

Notes and references

  1. Star Wars: The Clone Wars: Sharpshooter
  2. Planet of Twilight
  3. Star Wars: Jedi Knight: Dark Forces II
  4. 4.0 4.1 Dark Forces: Rebel Agent
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 Wretched Hives of Scum & Villainy page 88

See also

External links


This article uses material from the "Hologram" article on the Starwars wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

SWG Wiki

Up to date as of February 04, 2010

From SWG Wiki

Hologram is a projected three-dimensional representation of a person or object, commonly used as decorative art.

Table of contents

Loot holograms

Quest rewards

Veteran rewards

Anniversary rewards

Misc. Rewards

See also

Sources


This article uses material from the "Hologram" article on the SWG Wiki wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Transformers

Up to date as of February 05, 2010

From Teletraan I: The Transformers Wiki

A hologram is an artificially created image using photons arranged in a manner to better display information...or trick people, depending on the situation at hand.

Contents

Fiction

Generation One cartoon

The Autobot Hound often made use of holograms. While guarding Ravage with Mirage, Hound came up with the idea to use a hologram to trick the Decepticons and lead them into an ambush. Optimus Prime agreed, and Ravage was allowed to escape, believing he had learned of a military base with large amounts of rocket fuel. Megatron, however, saw through Ravage's escape, sending the Decepticons to the real base, while he went with a group of shoddy Decepticons to rub it in Prime's face. The hologram of the base worked just fine, though... More Than Meets the Eye, Part 3

Shockwave was using a holographic projector to train with Sentinel drones when the Combaticons arrived and attacked them. Later, Shockwave and Starscream used the holographic projector to create various images of hostiles. This successfully distracted the Combaticons for some time, until Swindle discovered that their attackers were holograms. The Combaticons aren't really smart. That's why they let Onslaught do all the thinking. The Revenge of Bruticus

IDW comics continuity

Recognizing that the Autobots' lack of drivers would attract attention, they used Holomatter avatars to avoid detection. However, security measures can be devised specifically to detect holomatter, showing that organizations such as the Machination already anticipated Cybertronian interference.

Beast Wars/Beast Machines

By the Beast Era, holograms were in more wide scale use, including such applications as entertainment and military use. The Axalon and the Darksyde both made extensive use of hologram technology to run simulations and observe events in real time. On Cybertron, there were holo-chips which allowed Transformers to interface with them and see things virtually—some of which were not always virtuous, if you get our meaning. Sparkwar Part 2: The Search.

This seat's taken.

Unicron Trilogy

The Autobots used holographic drivers while on Earth. At one point, the US President's image is used by Six-Speed in order to avoid trouble with the police. Collapse The holograms are translucent, but human viewers don't seem to notice.

Movie

After introducing the Autobots, Optimus Prime showed Sam Witwicky and Mikaela Banes a hologram of the devastation Cybertron suffered during the war with Megatron. The Decepticons also made use of holograms, using a single, mustached male as a display to avoid attracting attention. Oddly enough, the Decepticon holograms appear to have solid machinery underneath them, but when activated they appear to be a projection with nothing under the surface.

Animated

In Transformers Animated, Prowl will sometimes project a hologram of a mustached police officer riding him while in vehicle mode, as to remain conspicuous. Nothing says "inconspicuous" like a motorcycle without a rider. He's also fond of creating false images of himself, the better to ambush enemies who attack the wrong Prowl.

External links


This article uses material from the "Hologram" article on the Transformers wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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