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Chris Chelios: Misc

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Ice Hockey

Up to date as of February 02, 2010

An Ice Hockey Wiki article.

Position Defenceman
Shoots Right
Height
Weight
5 ft 11 in (1.8 m)
191 lb (87 kg)
NHL Team
F. Teams
Detroit Red Wings
Chicago Blackhawks
Montreal Canadiens
Nationality USA
Born January 25, 1962,
Chicago, IL, USA
NHL Draft 40th overall, 1981
Montreal Canadiens
Pro Career 1983 – present

Chris Chelios (born Christos Kostas Tselios on January 25, 1962) is an American professional defenseman for the Detroit Red Wings. Chelios has also played in the NHL for the Montreal Canadiens and Chicago Blackhawks. He has played in the NHL since 1984, and has earned many awards during his long career. Chelios is the oldest active player in the NHL, has played the most games of any active player in the NHL, and has the most career penalty minutes of any active player. On November 24, 2006, he played in his 1,496th NHL game, the most of any American-born player, passing the record total of Phil Housley. In the 2008–09 season, he appeared in the playoffs for an NHL record 24th time, having missed the playoffs only once (1997–98) in his entire career.

Contents

Playing career

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Early years

Chelios was then drafted by the Montreal Canadiens in the 1981 NHL Entry Draft. Prior to that, he played for the Moose Jaw Canucks of the SJHL where he tallied 87 points and 175 penalty minutes in just 54 games in his final season for the Moose Jaw Canucks. Chelios enjoyed two strong years at the University of Wisconsin-Madison after being drafted. As one of the top collegiate players in the country, he was selected for the United States at the 1981–82 World Junior Ice Hockey Championship. In 1983, he was part of the Badgers' NCAA Men's Ice Hockey Championship team and was named to the all-tournament team and the second WCHA all-star team.

Chelios was a member of the U.S. Olympic team for the 1984 Winter Olympics in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia. After that he made his debut for the Canadiens, playing 12 games in the regular season and 15 in the playoffs. That summer he joined the U.S. team at the 1984 Canada Cup.

The Montreal years

In 1984, he made the Montreal Canadiens for good, and distinguished himself with his play. He earned a trip to the National Hockey League All-Star Game and was named to the 1985 NHL All-Rookie Team. He scored 64 points in 74 games, a high total for a defenseman, even in the higher-scoring 1980s. In the playoffs that year, he scored 10 points in 9 games, with a +17 plus/minus. Although he only played 41 games in the 1985-1986 season, he won his first Stanley Cup, playing in front of Conn Smythe Trophy winner Patrick Roy.

Following two more good seasons, Chelios really broke out in the 1988-1989 season. He scored 73 points in 80 games at +35, was named to the All-Star First-Team, and won the James Norris Memorial Trophy. During that year's Wales Conference Finals series against the Philadelphia Flyers (which the Canadiens won in six games), Chelios became reviled by Flyer fans for a hit on Brian Propp that left the Philadelphia winger with a concussion and forced him to miss the next game. For the remainder of the series, the Flyers vented their anger against Chelios until finally, late in Game 6, Flyer goaltender Ron Hextall whacked his stick and blocker pad at Chelios, apparently in retaliation for the hit.

After playing only 53 games in the next season (in which he served as co-captain, with Guy Carbonneau), on June 29, 1990, Chelios was traded to the Chicago Blackhawks with a 2nd-round draft pick for Denis Savard, who is now in the Hockey Hall of Fame.

The Chicago years

In his first season with Chicago, he continued to score at his usual rate, tallying 64 points, and earned a spot on the Second NHL All-Star Team. Chelios would help lead the Blackhawks to the Stanley Cup Final in 1992, before losing to the Pittsburgh Penguins. He was in top form for the 1992-1993 season, scoring 73 points and won another Norris Trophy.

In 1995–96, Chelios would have another great season for the Blackhawks, scoring 73 points and winning his third Norris Trophy. When the Summer of 1996 rolled around, he would help lead the United States to its biggest international hockey win since the 1980 Winter Olympics, beating Canada in the 1996 World Cup of Hockey final series and was named to the All-Tournament Team. Chelios was captain of the Blackhawks from 1995 to 1999.

The Detroit years

By 1999, though, Chelios was starting to show signs of age. At 37, his career was clearly in decline, and he was no longer the offensive and defensive force he had once been. However, even if he did not have much to offer the Blackhawks, he could still help teams with his veteran leadership and his largely-remaining talent. On March 23, he was traded to the Detroit Red Wings for Anders Eriksson and two first-round draft picks.

The move to Detroit, where he had fewer responsibilities and more skilled teammates, helped keep Chelios playing at close to his peak level. In 2002, his +40 plus/minus led the league, and he was again named to the First All-Star Team. He also led the United States hockey team to a silver medal in the 2002 Winter Olympics, and was named to the Tournament's All-Star Team. His season culminated in the Red Wings' victory over the Carolina Hurricanes in the Stanley Cup Finals, giving Chelios his second Stanley Cup.

File:Chris chelios.jpg

In 2004, because of the cancellation of the NHL season, Chelios, along with fellow Red Wing teammates Derian Hatcher and Kris Draper, decided to play hockey for the Motor City Mechanics, a UHL team based out of Fraser, Michigan. He was heavily criticized for this decision as the UHL has a maximum salary in place, but at the same time he was strongly against a salary cap in the NHL. In October 2004 he trained with the U.S. bobsled federation in a bid to compete for the Greek bobsled team at the 2006 Winter Olympics. While Chelios didn't compete in the bobsled, he did captain the USA hockey team at the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, Italy.

On August 4, 2005, the 43-year-old re-signed with the Red Wings for a one-year contract.

Recent years

On February 1, 2006, Chelios was again named captain of the US Olympic Hockey Team that played at the 2006 Winter Olympics in Torino, Italy. Chelios was also captain in the 1998 Nagano games and of the silver-medal-winning team in the 2002 Salt Lake City games.

On May 24, 2006, Chelios signed a one-year contract with the Detroit Red Wings. On July 3, 2006, Chelios became the active leader for most games played upon the retirement of teammate Steve Yzerman. On April 21, 2007, he became the oldest defenseman to score a short-handed goal in the NHL in a playoff game against Calgary Flames.

On May 22, 2007, at Game 6 of the 2007 Western Conference Finals, Chelios and the Red Wings were eliminated from postseason play by the Anaheim Ducks. After the game, Chelios did not shake the hands of the Anaheim Ducks at center ice, as is the custom, and chose instead to shake the hands of only the coaches at their bench. This drew much criticism from fans and the media. He later stated that he was overcome by emotion, and felt he could not maintain his composure on the ice.[1]

On June 12, 2007, Chelios re-signed with the Detroit Red Wings for one year. This is his 24th NHL season and 10th with the Red Wings.

On January 8, 2008, Chelios became the second oldest player in the history of the NHL, at 45 years, 348 days, passing Moe Roberts. Only Gordie Howe, who played until age 52, was older. Chelios is older than his coach Mike Babcock.

On April 12, 2008, Chelios played in his 248th playoff game, breaking the NHL record set by Hall of Fame goaltender Patrick Roy.

On June 4, 2008, although he had not played in the Stanley Cup Finals (he played 14 playoff games during the 2008 playoffs), he had played enough games in the regular season to be a part of the Stanley Cup winning team. At the age of 46, he became the oldest active player to win the Stanley Cup.

Through 2007–08, Chelios is one of five currently active NHL players to be a captain of two different NHL teams, with the Montreal Canadiens and the Chicago Blackhawks. The players sharing this honour are Chris Drury, Jason Smith, Chris Pronger and Michael Peca.

On September 9, 2008, he signed with the Red Wings for his 25th NHL season. This will be his 11th season with the Red Wings.[2] It will match Mark Messier as second only to Gordie Howe for the most NHL seasons played in a career.

On December 5, 2008, Chelios played in his first of two games for the Grand Rapids Griffins, the American Hockey League farm club for the Red Wings, as part of a conditioning stint. At 46 years of age, he became the oldest player in the 73-year history of the AHL.[3]

On April 11, 2009, during a game against the Chicago Blackhawks, Chelios played forward rather than defense.

Awards


Career statistics

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts +/- PIM GP G A Pts +/- PIM
1978–79 Moose Jaw Canucks SJHL 24 3 16 19 - 68 - - - - - -
1979–80 Moose Jaw Canucks SJHL 53 12 31 42 - 118 - - - - - -
1980–81 Moose Jaw Canucks SJHL 54 23 64 87 - 175 - - - - - -
1981–82 Wisconsin Badgers WCHA 43 6 43 49 - 50 - - - - - -
1982–83 Wisconsin Badgers WCHA 45 16 32 48 - 62 - - - - - -
1983–84 Montreal Canadiens NHL 12 0 2 2 -5 12 15 1 9 10 3 17
1984–85 Montreal Canadiens NHL 74 9 55 64 11 87 9 2 8 10 2 17
1985–86 Montreal Canadiens NHL 41 8 26 34 4 67 20 2 9 11 3 49
1986–87 Montreal Canadiens NHL 71 11 55 66 -5 124 17 4 9 13 -1 38
1987–88 Montreal Canadiens NHL 71 20 41 61 14 172 11 3 1 4 3 29
1988–89 Montreal Canadiens NHL 80 15 58 73 35 185 21 4 15 19 2 28
1989–90 Montreal Canadiens NHL 53 9 22 31 20 136 5 0 1 1 -4 8
1990–91 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 77 12 52 64 23 192 6 1 7 8 2 46
1991–92 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 80 9 47 56 24 245 18 6 15 21 19 37
1992–93 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 84 15 58 73 14 282 4 0 2 2 -1 14
1993–94 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 76 16 44 60 12 212 6 1 1 2 0 8
1994–95 EHC Biel Swiss-A 3 0 3 3 - 4 - - - - - -
1994–95 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 48 5 33 38 17 72 16 4 7 11 6 12
1995–96 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 81 14 58 72 25 140 9 0 3 3 2 8
1996–97 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 72 10 38 48 16 112 6 0 1 1 -2 8
1997–98 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 81 3 39 42 -7 151 - - - - - -
1998–99 Chicago Blackhawks NHL 65 8 26 34 -4 89 - - - - - -
1998–99 Detroit Red Wings NHL 10 1 1 2 5 4 10 0 4 4 -6 14
1999–00 Detroit Red Wings NHL 81 3 31 34 48 103 9 0 1 1 -3 8
2000–01 Detroit Red Wings NHL 24 0 3 3 4 45 5 1 0 1 -1 2
2001–02 Detroit Red Wings NHL 79 6 33 39 40 126 24 1 13 14 15 44
2002–03 Detroit Red Wings NHL 66 2 17 19 4 78 4 0 0 0 -3 2
2003–04 Detroit Red Wings NHL 69 2 19 21 12 61 8 0 1 1 1 4
2004–05 Motor City Mechanics UHL 23 5 19 24 - 25 - - - - - -
2005–06 Detroit Red Wings NHL 81 4 7 11 22 108 6 0 0 0 2 6
2006–07 Detroit Red Wings NHL 71 0 11 11 11 34 18 1 6 7 7 12
2007–08 Detroit Red Wings NHL 69 3 9 12 11 36 18 0 0 0 2 10
2008–09 Detroit Red Wings NHL 29 0 0 0 1 18 4 0 0 0 1 0
NHL totals 1645 185 763 948 342 2891 265 31 113 144 49 421

International play

His only Olympic medal came from the 2002 Salt Lake games, winning the Silver losing to team Canada. Chelios played a key role in the Team USA win over Canada in the 1996 World Cup of Hockey. He captained the US team in 2004 World Cup of Hockey where the USA lost in its semi-final to Finland.

External links

  • Chris Chelios at TSN.ca
  • Chris Chelios's career stats at The Internet Hockey Database
  • Chris Chelios's biography at Legends of Hockey
  • Chris Chelios' bio @ hockeydraftcentral.com
  • ESPN Article
  • Chris Chelios' U.S. Olympic Team bio
  • NHL.com - Ice Age: April 20, 2007
  • Cheli's Chili Official Site
Preceded by
Peter Laviolette
US Men's Olympic Hockey Team Captain
1998, 2002, 2006
Succeeded by
n/a
Preceded by
Dirk Graham
Chicago Blackhawks captains
1995-99
Succeeded by
Doug Gilmour
Preceded by
Bob Gainey
Montreal Canadiens captains
1989–90
Co-captains with Guy Carbonneau
Succeeded by
Guy Carbonneau
Preceded by
Paul Coffey
Winner of the Norris Trophy
1996
Succeeded by
Brian Leetch
Preceded by
Brian Leetch
Winner of the Norris Trophy
1993
Succeeded by
Ray Bourque
Preceded by
Ray Bourque
Winner of the Norris Trophy
1989
Succeeded by
Ray Bourque
Preceded by
Joe Sakic and Patrik Eliáš
Winner of the NHL Plus/Minus Award
2002
Succeeded by
Peter Forsberg and Milan Hejduk
This page uses content from Wikipedia. The original article was at Chris Chelios. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with Ice Hockey Wiki, the text of Wikipedia is available under the GNU Free Documentation License.

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This article uses material from the "Chris Chelios" article on the Ice Hockey wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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