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Dr Who

Up to date as of January 31, 2010

From TARDIS Index File, the free Doctor Who reference.

The Doctor and Ace playing chess in 1638.

Chess is a game where a two players (one black/one white) move their pieces to try and capture their opponent's king.

K-9 played chess against the Doctor. (DW: The Sun Makers) The Doctor also played a game of chess against Frobisher but the game had more than one board and some stood up vertically to form a cube. (DWM: War-Game) Frobisher also played chess against a Robotic arm. (DWM: Profits of Doom)

K-9 playing chess againist againist the Fourth Doctor (DW: The Sun Makers)

Chess was particularly favoured by the Seventh Doctor when battling certain enemies (in particular Fenric). He was also accused by Ace and Bernice Summerfield as playing with their lives "as though you would a game of chess". (DW: The Curse of Fenric)

While battling Lady Peinforte, de Flores, and Cybermen, the Doctor and Ace traveled to 1638, where the Doctor played chess against an unknown opponent (thought to be Fenric). (DW: Silver Nemesis) Morgaine stated that she could always beat the Doctor at chess. (DW: Battlefield)

A trap in the Tomb of Rassilon resembled a chess board. Nothing happened until a visitor reached the fifth row, and then the board became a giant death trap. (DW: The Five Doctors)

Haresh Chandra taught Luke Smith how to play chess, and was subsequently beaten by him six times in a row. (SJA: The Eternity Trap)


This article uses material from the "Chess" article on the Dr Who wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Memory-beta

Up to date as of February 02, 2010

Memory Beta, the wiki for licensed Star Trek content.

Chess is a game which originated on Earth, akin to the Klingon klin zha or Romulan latrunculo. (TOS novel: The Final Reflection)

The traditional two-dimensional variation later gave rise to more complicated successors such as three-dimensional chess (TOS episode: "Where No Man Has Gone Before") and four-dimensional chess (TOS novel: My Enemy, My Ally).

Jeremy Grayson, a Human ancestor of Spock, was a grand master level chess player. (TOS novel: Strangers from the Sky)


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External links


This article uses material from the "Chess" article on the Memory-beta wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Lostpedia

Up to date as of February 07, 2010
(Redirected to Games article)

From Lostpedia

This article is about games shown in episodes of Lost. For other uses, see: Game (disambiguation)

Several games are featured in the storyline of Lost.

Contents

Occurrences

Game Picture Notes
Axis and Allies
wikipedia
or
Risk
wikipedia
  • Locke was seen playing a board game, during lunchbreak, with one of his colleagues. The game appeared to consist of a Risk board and generic plastic army men, but is probably meant to strongly resemble Axis and Allies. ("Walkabout")
  • A similar game was played by Locke, Sawyer, and Hurley at the Barracks. This was the 2005 "library" edition of the game with triangular blocks rather than figurines of soldiers. ("The Shape of Things to Come")
Backgammon
wikipedia
  • Locke claimed Backgammon is a better game than Checkers, dating back 5,000 years. ("Pilot, Part 2") Locke was referring to the Mesopotamian Royal Game of Ur, which is also related to the Egyptian game of senet.
  • Locke explained the rules of Backgammon to Walt, mentioning that "There are two players. One side is light, and one side is dark." ("Pilot, Part 2")
  • Walt was seen beating Hurley, even though Hurley claimed he was once ranked 17th in a tournament. Hurley lost $83,000 through his Backgammon games with Walt, who doesn't know that Hurley is good for the money. ("All the Best Cowboys Have Daddy Issues")
  • Locke and Charlie played it on the beach, to which Locke brought up Charlies heroin addiction. ("Abandoned")
  • Kate was playing it by herself. ("Left Behind")
  • Locke and Sawyer played it while Locke asked if the group still had confidence in him. ("Eggtown")
  • Even as a child, Locke liked Backgammon. ("Cabin Fever")
  • In the non-canonical novel Endangered Species, Locke finds the backgammon set with Faith.
Baseball
main article
wikipedia
Chess
main article
wikipedia

Connect Four
wikipedia
Crossword puzzles
main article
wikipedia
Football
wikipedia
  • Jack played American football with Tom during his time with the Others. ("Par Avion")
Golf
wikipedia
Horseshoes
wikipedia
I Never
main article
wikipedia
Mouse Trap
wikipedia
  • Locke demonstrated the game Mouse Trap to a child before catching a glimpse of his mother. ("Deus Ex Machina")
  • A Mouse Trap game (box upside down) was seen in front of the window Kate was staring at in the barracks rec room. ("Left Behind")
  • On a Mouse Trap board, every third space contains only the number 23 (really a juxtaposition of 2&3) and every third space contains the numbers 23 and 4
Ping-Pong
wikipedia
  • A ping-pong table was shown in the Swan station. ("The Long Con")
  • A ping-pong table was mentioned in a notebook read by Kate. ("Live Together, Die Alone")
  • Sawyer challenged Hurley to a match to win his stash back. Hurley wins the game. ("Enter 77")
  • A match between Sawyer and Hurley is interrupted by Nikki. ("Exposé")
  • Sawyer plays Jack after his return from the Others' camp, joking that they have to do so every 108 minutes or the island will explode. ("Catch-22")
Poker
wikipedia
Football
(Assoc. Soccer)
wikipedia

Minor occurrences

  • Basketball
  • Pool
  • Foosball
  • Darts
  • A dartboard is also in the Barrack's rec room when Benjamin and Sayid are being held by Locke.("The Economist") It's pattern is in Black and White.
  • There is a dartboard and darts in the Swan station which become magnetically attracted towards the electro magnetic force behind the wall of the station at the end of Series 2.

Recurring themes

The metagame

Games as a metaphor

"I like to use the baseball metaphor which is, you can go to a baseball game and if you don't know a lot about baseball, I think you can enjoy it on one level as a casual viewer and you can enjoy it on a much deeper level as a regular viewer". -- Carlton Cuse in the "Lost Survivor Guide"

  • Operation: Locke told Jack "I'm removing the driest pieces to minimize our risk transporting it. You ever play Operation?"
    Metaphor: The removal of the dynamite was compared to the tenseness of the game of Operation.
  • Mouse Trap: Locke said "One by one, you build the trap - shoe, bucket, tub - piece by piece it all comes together. And then you wait 'til your opponent lands here on the old cheese wheel. And then if you set it up just right, you spring the trap."
  • Metaphor: Locke's description of Mouse Trap mirrored the con Locke's father orchestrated to steal Locke's kidney, and in a more general sense, the ongoing con of Locke by Jacob's nemesis, giving him faith in the island in order to occupy his body and kill Jacob.
  • Metaphor: Jack's bluffing in Poker was mirrored in his successful ploy to outwit Sawyer, and in Ben's ploy to lie to Locke
  • Baseball: Christian Shephard told Sawyer "You are suffering. But, don't beat yourself up about it. It's fate. Some people are just supposed to suffer. That's why the Red Sox will never win the damn series."
    Metaphor: The futility of Sawyer trying to end his own suffering was compared with the futility of the Red Sox trying to win a World Series. (see also: Irony)

The Numbers

The games have references to the Numbers:

  • The objective of Connect Four is to get 4 discs in a row on a plane of 42 holes.
  • Backgammon consists of two sets of 15 checkers. There are 4 sets of six playable spaces. A die has six numbers on it, the same amount of Numbers there are. The doubling cube has the numbers 4, 8, 16 and 32 on it (which is 23 backwards). The most number of spaces (without being taken out of play) a piece can move if the player is not yet able to take their pieces off the board (which requires all the player's pieces to be in the last six spaces on their side is 23.
  • Each player in chess starts with 16 pieces on an 8 by 8 grid.

Black and white

Several games are depicted or described as black and white:

  • Locke specifically describes the pieces on a Backgammon board as "One side is light, and one side is dark". The playable spaces on the board also alternate with one being light and one being dark. The dice are white and the dots on them are black.
  • The pieces on a chess board are black and white.
  • The crossword puzzles are depicted as a grid of black and white squares.

Producers' commentary

I feel like we're playing a chess game. In the first six moves, we've lost our queen and two bishops, and the audience is saying 'They are the worst chess players in the world!' What they don't realize is that we're nine moves away from checkmating you. If we lose, we lose. But that's the play, and we're standing by it.

See also

  • Counter-Strike: Source map
  • The Lost Experience
  • Myst
  • Outside references to Lost - by the games: PvP Online's Lost Role Playing Game, Ctrl+Alt+Del's parody of Command & Conquer 3, The Impossible Quiz web game, the game "Desert Island" in The Office, Half-Life 2

This article uses material from the "Games" article on the Lostpedia wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Starwars

Up to date as of February 04, 2010

From Wookieepedia, the Star Wars wiki.

Han Solo and Bollux/Blue Max play chess.

Chess was a board game played throughout the galaxy.

A more advanced version known as holochess was derived from the game, and it was most likely related to similar strategy games like dejarik.

The Mon Calamari were noted throughout the galaxy as master chess players. Han Solo had a chess set onboard the Millennium Falcon which he occasionally enjoyed, and he was once beaten soundly at the game by the diminutive droid Blue Max.[1] The Slith known as Sssiii entertained visitors to the Galactic Circus by playing chess.[2]

Behind the scenes

Chess in the Star Wars galaxy appears to be the same game as chess on the planet Earth. Real world chess also inspired the game of Dejarik.

Appearances

Sources

Notes and references

External links


This article uses material from the "Chess" article on the Starwars wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Tibia

Up to date as of February 05, 2010

From TibiaWiki

Thais Chess Board

Chess is an intellectual game for 2 players that can be played in the Game Rooms in Carlin, Edron, Kazordoon, Thais, and Yalahar.

Goal
The goal of the game is to capture your opponent's King. All other lost tokens are merely casualties. The game is not won until the King is captured.
Setup
The game board is arranged as follows. Note that the Queen is always on her own color square. A regulation board will have a White square in your lower-right corner, indicating that Chess boards in Tibia are to be played horizontally (white on the left, black on the right):
Image:White Castle Token.gif Image:White Knight Token.gif Image:White Bishop Token.gif Image:White King Token.gif Image:White Queen Token.gif Image:White Bishop Token.gif Image:White Knight Token.gif Image:White Castle Token.gif
Image:White Pawn Token.gif Image:White Pawn Token.gif Image:White Pawn Token.gif Image:White Pawn Token.gif Image:White Pawn Token.gif Image:White Pawn Token.gif Image:White Pawn Token.gif Image:White Pawn Token.gif
               
               
               
               
Image:Black Pawn Token.gif Image:Black Pawn Token.gif Image:Black Pawn Token.gif Image:Black Pawn Token.gif Image:Black Pawn Token.gif Image:Black Pawn Token.gif Image:Black Pawn Token.gif Image:Black Pawn Token.gif
Image:Black Castle Token.gif Image:Black Knight Token.gif Image:Black Bishop Token.gif Image:Black King Token.gif Image:Black Queen Token.gif Image:Black Bishop Token.gif Image:Black Knight Token.gif Image:Black Castle Token.gif
Playing
Each different kind of game token has different rules that govern how it is allowed to move:
  • Image:Black Pawn Token.gif Image:White Pawn Token.gif Pawns can only move forward one space, but can only capture a game token by moving diagonally forward one space. Pawns are the only pieces that cannot move backwards. Only in the first move a pawn makes, it is allowed to move 2 squares forward instead of one (see Wikipedia:Pawn (chess) for more info and better explanation).

  • Image:Black Castle Token.gif Image:White Castle Token.gif Castles (Rooks) can move any number of squares in a straight vertical or horizontal line.

  • Image:Black Knight Token.gif Image:White Knight Token.gif Knights must make two steps every turn. One step must be 2 squares and the other step must be 1 square (may be taken in any order). Also, the second step must be perpendicular to the first. The Knight is the only chess piece that can jump over other pieces (see Wikipedia:Knight_(chess) for more info and better explanation).

  • Image:Black Bishop Token.gif Image:White Bishop Token.gif Bishops can move any number of squares diagonally.

  • Image:Black Queen Token.gif Image:White Queen Token.gif Queens can move any number of squares in any straight line (up/down, left/right and diagonally)

  • Image:Black King Token.gif Image:White King Token.gif Kings can move one square in any direction.

If a player's king is in a position where they can be captured in the next turn, their king is in "Check", meaning he is in danger.
You cannot make a move that would place your own king in "check".
Winning
Gameplay continues until one player's King has been captured, or they have no legal moves that allow them to prevent their king from being captured (called "Check Mate").

For a complete set of rules and more information, see Wikipedia's article on Chess.

See list of Tibia Games.


This article uses material from the "Chess" article on the Tibia wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Transformers

Up to date as of February 05, 2010

From Teletraan I: The Transformers Wiki

They're actually both looking for characterization.
Let's see what you can see...

This article is in need of images.


Chess is an Earthen game originating from a landmass known to the squishy fleshlings that inhabit it as India. Because of the Hungry Dragon campaign, two versions of this game include pieces based on an elaborate cover-up by an autonomous goverment agency.

Merchandise

  • TRANSFORMERS Chess Set (2007)
This version of the game includes game pieces based on the film, with silver Decepticons and golden Autobots. The insignia of both factions are used as pawns. Optimus Prime is the Autobot king and Megatron is the Decepticon one. Ironhide and Starscream are queens, Jazz and Barricade are bishops, Bumblebee and Blackout are knights and Ratchet and Bonecrusher are rooks.
You left a piece out!

This article is a stub and is missing information. You can help Teletraan I: The Transformers Wiki by expanding it.


This article uses material from the "Chess" article on the Transformers wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.







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