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Dr Who

Up to date as of January 31, 2010

From TARDIS Index File, the free Doctor Who reference.

Birthright
Series: Doctor Who -
Virgin New Adventures
Release Number: 17
Doctor: Seventh Doctor (mostly absent in this adventure)
Companions: Ace, Benny
Enemy: the Charrl, Jared Khan
Setting: Earth, London, February, 1909
Antýkhon, 22,000
Author: Nigel Robinson
Publisher: Virgin Books
Publication: August 1993
Format: Paperback Book, 216 Pages
ISBN: ISBN 0426203933
Previous Story: Shadowmind
Following Story: Iceberg

Contents

Publisher's Summary

'I feel like a pawn in a blasted chess game, Ace.' 'I know what you mean. Trouble is, they keep changing the chess-players.'

The TARDIS has died. Stranded in early twentieth-century London, Bernice can only stand and watch as it slowly disintegrates.

In the East End a series of grisly murders has been committed. Is this the work of the ghostly Springheel Jack or, as Bernice suspects something even more sinister?

In a tiny shop in Bloomsbury, the master of a grand order of sorcerers is nearing the end of a seven-hundred year quest for a fabled magic wand.

And on a barren world in the far-distant future the Queen of a dying race pleads for the help of an old hermit named Muldwych, while Ace leads a group of guerrillas in a desperate struggle against their alien oppressors.

These events are related. Perhaps the Doctor knows how. But the Doctor has gone away.

Characters

  • Ace
    • Gets stuck in 22,000.
  • Bernice Summerfield
    • Gets stuck in 1909.
    • Can't read Cyrillic.
    • She gets the flu.
  • the Charrl
  • Queen Ch'tizz
  • Jared Khan
    • Born 700 years ago.
  • Margaret Waterfield
  • Muldwych
    • Is most likely the 'Merlin' incarnation of the Doctor.
    • Got stranded on Antýkhon for 1000 years.

References

  • Antýkhon turns out to be a future Earth.
  • The Brotherhood of the New Dawn believes man has become decadent and evil.
  • Springheel Jack similar to Jack the Ripper, except springheel is a Charrl which has emerged through a time portal.
  • The Great Divide a temporal portal from 22,000ish to 1909.
  • Time Vector Generator is an ebony bar that links the exterior and interior dimensions of a TARDIS.
  • The Migration the Charrl's movement from Anty'kon to Earth.
  • Channel Tunnel still survives in 22,000.
  • The Charrl created 300 of the 700 Wonders of the Universe.
  • New Skaro is mentioned as the new home planet of the Daleks.

Notes

  • This novel almost does not feature the Doctor.
  • A prelude to this novel was published in DWM Issue 203.
  • The jacket illustration for this book was incorrectly reproduced as a full-colour page in Doctor Who: Timeframe: The Illustrated History. A second edition and paperback corrected this error.

Continuity

  • This novel runs parallel with the events of NA: Iceberg, with the Doctor being absent for the majority of Birthright. This was the first "Doctor-lite" novel under the New Adventures banner (Target Books previously published two non-Doctor original novels, Harry Sullivan's War and Turlough and the Earthlink Dilemma), and in some ways was a rehearsal for the later Doctor-less series of novels featuring Benny that began in 1996.
  • The Charrl are to said to have created the 300 (of the 700) wonders of the universe, first mentioned in DW: Death to the Daleks.

External Links


Virgin New Adventures
Previous Release:
Shadowmind
Next Release:
Iceberg


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This article uses material from the "Birthright" article on the Dr Who wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Memory-beta

Up to date as of February 02, 2010

Memory Beta, the wiki for licensed Star Trek content.

EPISODE
Birthright
Attribution
Series: The Next Generation
Written by: Part 1 - Brannon Braga
Part 2 - René Echevarria
Directed by: Part 1 - Winrich Kolbe
Part 2 - Dan Curry
Production information
Episode no.: 6x16 and 6x17
Production no.: 242 and 243
First aired: Part 1 - 22 February 1993
Part 2 - 1 March 1993
Chronology
Date: 2369
Stardate 46578.4 to 46579.2

Contents

Introduction

Summary

This article is a stub relating to a canon episode. You can help our database by expanding on it.

Characters

Regulars

Others

References

Starships

Locations

Species

States and Organisations

Information

Related Stories

Images

Reviews

Connections

published order
Previous episode:
Tapestry
TNG episode produced Next episode:
Starship Mine
Previous episode:
Tapestry
TNG episode aired Next episode:
Starship Mine
chronological order
Previous Adventure:
Seven of Nine (Prologue)
Pocket Next Adventure:
The Star Ghost

This article uses material from the "Birthright" article on the Memory-beta wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

DC Comics

Up to date as of February 01, 2010
(Redirected to Superman: Birthright article)

From DC Database

Storyline Template Storyline Template
Superman: Birthright

Superman: Birthright
Gallery
Official Name
Superman: Birthright
Storyline Aliases
Birthright

Universe

Locations

Characters

Villains


Titles
Superman: Birthright

Collected
Superman: Birthright
(Trade Paperback)


First appearance
Last appearance

Superman: Birthright #1
(September, 2003)
Superman: Birthright #12

Contents

History

Superman: Birthright presented a modernized revamping of Superman's origin and early history. It was first presented in the twelve-issue Superman: Birthright limited series. Mark Waid's Superman: Birthright is now the accepted canonical origin story of Superman. Waid was assigned the task with the purpose being to streamline the comic origin making it similar to both the movies (with Superman Returns then on the horizon) as well as -- perhaps especially -- Smallville, which had proven very popular. The following summary is from the 12 series.

The cold, fairly dystopian re-imagining of Krypton created by John Byrne in the 1986 The Man of Steel limited series was jettisoned. Much like Jeph Loeb and others had done with their "Return to Krypton" arcs, Waid restored the idea of Krypton being more like it had been in the Silver Age--a place of great wonder and myth. In Jor-El's words, the "people grew tired of war, so they made peace; they feared the unknown, so they conquered it with science; and they yearned for heaven, so they created it beneath their very feet...". A substantial change was with the S-shield as well--no longer was it a symbol for his family's house, as it had been in the Silver Age, or merely an "S" standing for Superman, as it had been in Byrne's revamp, but now it was the Kryptonian symbol for hope. It was shown to be a popular symbol, used on flags, paintings, jewelry, and monuments all over Krypton. It was also on a red, blue, and yellow tapestry that was included in Kal-El's rocket ship. Jor-El was still the scientist whom no one would believe, but instead of Kal-El being an embryo when he was rocketed off, he was again said to be a young child.

The Kents were still farmers, as always, but they were even younger than they had been before. Whereas John Byrne had portrayed them as perhaps in their early to mid thirties when they found Kal-El (making them in their mid sixties or perhaps even seventies during Superman's adventures), Waid portrays them as being between 20 and 25 (again to make them closer to their Smallville counterparts). Their characters are also given an overhaul in their personalities to make them more "modern." Martha, for example, is far from the simple lovable, wise farmer's wife who loves to bake and knit. She is portrayed as being fascinated with aliens, U.F.O.s, etc., and even runs her own website dedicated to such stuff when Clark is in his twenties.

The entire dynamic between John and Clark regarding his Superman identity has also been reversed. In Byrne's era, Superman was committed to using his powers in secret, and once "outed" he retreated to Smallville, unsure of what to do. It was Jonathan's suggestion that he adopt a costume and dual identity, inspired by the JSA of the 1940s. Waid's story, however, has Clark coming up with the idea of the costume and identity, and shows Jon dismayed at the idea, feeling like Clark is trying to abandon his identity (and, by extension, his connection to his earth family).

Waid also brought about a new (or arguably, reintroduced an old) vision power, sometimes referred to as "soul vision." Essentially, Clark can see the "aura" surrounding a living being--an aura that disappears when they die. Waid introduced this as a way of explaining why Clark feels so compelled to defend life, as he can literally see it. Going along with this power, Waid also changed Clark into a vegetarian. These decisions have met with mixed reactions from fans.

Issues

  • Superman: Birthright #1
  • Superman: Birthright #2
  • Superman: Birthright #3
  • Superman: Birthright #4
  • Superman: Birthright #5
  • Superman: Birthright #6
  • Superman: Birthright #7
  • Superman: Birthright #8
  • Superman: Birthright #9
  • Superman: Birthright #10
  • Superman: Birthright #11
  • Superman: Birthright #12

Paraphernalia

Items: None known.
Vehicles: None known.
Weapons: None known.

Notes

  • Due to the reality warping effects of Superboy-Prime's pounding of the dimensional barrier, Birthright and Man of Steel are now both canonical.

Trivia

  • No trivia.

Recommended Reading

Links and References

  • Superman: Birthright at Wikipedia.org
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Origin of Superman

The Origin of Superman is a popular concept fundamental to the Superman mythos that has received multiple treatments and iterations, usually involving significantly different versions of events.

Superman Family Storyline

This event or storyline is specifically related to Superman, or to members of the Superman Family. This template will automatically categorize articles that include it into the Superman Storylines category.


This article uses material from the "Superman: Birthright" article on the DC Comics wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Yugioh

Up to date as of February 05, 2010

This article uses material from the "Birthright" article on the Yugioh wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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